Ruins in Estonia

Kirumpää Castle Ruins

The first record of Kirumpää Castle (in German Kirrumpäh) dates back to the year 1322. It was one of the residences of Bishopric of Dorpat. The castle was destroyed in a Swedish-Russian war in 1658. Much of the ruins were used for construction in Võru town in XVIII-XIX century. Today, there is little left of the former castle. The ruins are located on a small scenic hill. Reference: Wikimedia Common ...
Founded: 1322 | Location: Võru, Estonia

Virtsu Castle Ruins

The castle of Virtsu belonged to vassals of the feudal state Bishopric of Ösel-Wiek - Western part of nowadays Estonia as well as part of Saaremaa and part of Hiiumaa. It was built in 1430 by Uexküll noble family and destroyed already in 16th century. Now the ruined walls are few metres high, but it really looks that there is almost nothing. That's because grass and bush is growing on the ruins. Reference: ...
Founded: 1430 | Location: Hanila, Estonia

Angerja Castle Ruins

The vassal tower-stronghold of Angerja was probably built in the 14th century. The rectangular construction was made of limestone, the walls were two meters thick and it was surrounded by a moat. Some parts of the walls remain to this day and a moat is still visible. It is thought that the stronghold was destroyed during the Livonian war. Tower-strongholds were built by vassals to protect themselves, mostly against peasa ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Kohila, Estonia

Tahkuranna Church

The Lutheran Church was built to the Võiste village in the end of 17th century. It was mainly reconstructed to the neo-Gothic appearance between 1890-1891. In 1941 church was badly damaged and today it is only partially restored. Worships are held in the near sacristy.
Founded: 1890-1891 | Location: Tahkuranna , Estonia

Osmussaar Church Ruins

The church of Osmussaar was built by Estonian Swedes in 1776. Today only ruined tower and some walls remain. Also the cemetery is destroyed.
Founded: 1776 | Location: Läänemaa, Estonia

Viru-Nigula Chapel Ruins

The ruins of the Viru-Nigula Maarja chapel, which was shaped like a Greek cross, is the only building of this kind from the Catholic period in Estonia. The ruins have also been associated with a Russian style church architecture The chapel probably dates back to the 13th century. Reference: Jaanus Plaat. Orthodoxy and Orthodox Sacral Buildings in Estonia from the 11th to the 19th centuries.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Viru-Nigula, Estonia

Lõhavere Hill Fort

Lõhavere was an ancient hill fort of Lembitu, the legendary chief of Estonians. It was used in defensive purposes about 20 years in the 12th and 13th centuries. Lembitu was killed in the battle of Madise (St. Matthew’s) day in 1217 by German crusaders and Latgalian allies. Towering in the middle of the forest, the hill of the fort with it's naturally deep slopes leaves an imposing impression even today. ...
Founded: 12th-13th centuries | Location: Suure-Jaani, Estonia

Kavilda Stronghold Ruins

The Kavilda stronghold (Kawelecht) was, according to Leonhard von Stryk, first built in 1354 by Bartholomäus von Tiesenhausen. Other sources say it was built in 1361 by Arnold von Vietinghoff, the Master of Livonian Order. The castle was destroyed during the Livonian War somewhere between 1564 and 1582. It was probably knocked down before the invasion of the Poles. Thereinafter Kavilda excisted only as a manor but no ...
Founded: 1350s-13060s | Location: Tartumaa, Estonia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Sirmione Castle

Sirmione castle was built near the end of the 12th century as part of a defensive network surrounding Verona. The castle was maintained and extended first as part of the Veronese protection against their rivals in Milan and later under the control of the Venetian inland empire. The massive fortress is totally surrounded by water and has an inner porch which houses a Roman and Medieval lapidary. From the drawbridge, a staircase leads to the walkways above the walls, providing a marvellous view of the harbour that once sheltered the Scaliger fleet. The doors were fitted with a variety of locking systems, including a drawbridge for horses, carriages and pedestrians, a metal grate and, more recently, double hinged doors. Venice conquered Sirmione in 1405, immediately adopting provisions to render the fortress even more secure, fortifying its outer walls and widening the harbour.

Thanks to its strategical geographical location as a border outpost, Sirmione became a crucial defence and control garrison for the ruling nobles, retaining this function until the 16th century, when its role was taken up by Peschiera del Garda.