Château d'Orcher was built to protect the mouth of the River Seine. The square keep was surrounded by a trapezoidal enceinte, defended in the 13th century by three square towers. In 1360 it was partly destroyed on the orders of officials from Harfleur. Rebuilt later, it was taken by the English in 1415 at the same time as Harfleur.

Thomas Planterose took possession of Château d'Orcher in 1735 and over the next ten years set about transforming the castle. He employed master masons François de la Motte and Jacques Lesueur, both from Picardy, and a master plasterer from Caudebec-en-Caux. The elegant woodwork was created by a carpenter Le Roux. The two north towers and the ruins of the great keep in the north-west were demolished, along with the curtain walls. In 1795, following the division of the estate with the death of Madame de Melmont, the property was described as a 'dwelling house castle and accessories and a farm of 145 acres'. In the 19th century, the estate became the property of the Rochechouart family, who had the castle, notably the tower, restored in 1857 by the architect P. Philippon.The castle grounds are open to the public all year. The Château d'Orcher is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture. It also includes an imposing square crenellated tower.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

3.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joe Faddoul (7 months ago)
Nice hotel near le havre, good location and service, rooms are a bit old but clean and enough for a good stay in the normandie area. You need a car to get there and move around the normandie.
Twinkun (9 months ago)
Very good
Abdul Karim Alchahen (9 months ago)
Ok
Alan Schelter (3 years ago)
It is very run down. My room has two doors that will not shut not to mention it seems to be that they spent the last amount of money though could on everything the room is supposed to include.
Daniel Buchar (3 years ago)
- poor breakfast - just french speaking staff - poor air-condition - Staff wanted to pay twice, mess in their reservation system - NO ONE DIDNT NOTIFY TO US THAT GATE IS CLOSING FROM 24:00 UNTIL 6:00 AND WE DIDNT RECEIVE ACCESS CODE FOR THE GATE!!! WE HAD TO WAIT TWO HOURS AND WE MISSED FLIGHT!!! AVOID THIS HOTEL AS FAR AS IS POSSIBLE!!!!
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