K.A. Almgren Silk Weaving

Stockholm, Sweden

The silk mill of K.A. Almgren is one the oldest preserved industrial environments in Scandinavia and the only remaining mill north of the Alps. It was founded by Knut August Almgren in 1833 when he got the license to manufacture silk products. only couple of decades later the silk mill was Scandinavias largest workplace for women. The same family produced silk during five generations.

The weawing mill was closed down in 1974, but re-opened again seventeen years later by Oscar Almgren. Today Almgren’s mill is still in production with 170 year old looms. It also exhibits the exciting history about the dawn of our industrial revolution, the Chamber of Commerce and more.

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Details

Founded: 1833
Category: Industrial sites in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Minna Kallankari (2 years ago)
Very nice little museum. I'm glad they haven't "cleaned" or made the premises too modern. We were lucky to get a short silk weaving demonstration also. Buy their splendid soap called 'Almgrens tvättvål' for silk and wool garments at the museum's shop.
Björn Eriksson (2 years ago)
Very interesting industrial heritage and museum of a textile moment in a rather recent swedish history.
Floflo Eriksson (2 years ago)
informative place to visit in Stockholm with nice textile industrial heritage and friendly and accommodating staff...
Maya Ebrahim (2 years ago)
Silk museum in the backstreets but included with the Stockholm pass. Brilliant demonstration of jacquard weaving and a lot of information about silk history in Stockholm. Wonderful if you have an interest in fabrics.
Adam Renberg Tamm (2 years ago)
Nice and cozy museum, and very cool to see the punch card weaving machines working.
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