Top Historic Sights in Fredericia, Denmark

Explore the historic highlights of Fredericia

St. Michael's Church

St. Michael"s Church was originally built in 1665-1668. Over the years, the church has been rebuilt several times and today the building is characterized by neoclassicism. In the beginning, the church was called “German Church” because it served the many German-speaking immigrants and not least the garrison who mainly spoke German. St. Michaelis Church has been Garrison Church from the beginning – and it still ...
Founded: 1665-1668 | Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Fredericia Fortress

Fredericia was established as a fortress town in 1650. On the land side, the town was laid out in circular form with nine large moated bastions. On the waterfront, the town had a somewhat weaker fortification line together with a citadel as its last defence. There is every indication that Fredericia was planned as a fortress town. The streets are regular and entirely perpendicular. Fredericia was the only town in Denmark ...
Founded: 1650 | Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Trinitatis Church

The present structure of Trinitatis Church was consecrated in 1690 and built in a late medieval style. A few decorated stones are included in the foundations, which come from a medieval church that was pulled down shortly after the setting up of Fredericia as a fortified town around 1650. The Romanesque font comes from the same source and along with a Baroque font canopy, is one of the church`s treasures. The majority of ...
Founded: 1690 | Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Pjedsted Church

Pjedsted church"s chancel and nave where built in Romanesque style in the 12th century. During the late Gothic period the nave was extended westward, where a combined porch and tower were also built. Note the large medieval oak door to the porch with iron reinforcements.  The finely carved and painted altar dates from about 1600 is adorned with a very attractive late Gothic altarpiece from about 1500.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Egeskov Church

The Egeskov Church chancel and nave are Romanesque, whilst the west tower and the porch on the south side date from the late Gothic period. Externally the chancel is highly ornate, the east wall including an attractive gable recess. After the Swedish wars 1657-60 the church was in ruins. The crucifix, which now hangs on the north wall of the nave, was the only thing to be spared. The altar piece, the pulpit and the font c ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Taulov Church

Taulov Church is a medieval church in traditional Danish style, and was constructed in the 13th century. In 1581 a chapel was added to the church. It functioned as a seamark for sailors on Kolding Fjord and Little Belt until modern navigation was introduced. The church was fully restored in 1999.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Bredstrup Church

Bredstrup Church dates from the late Romanesque period. The tower is from the late Gothic period. Only the porch is more recent, from the 1800s. The baptismal font is from the Romanesque period, the altarpiece in the late Baroque style is from 1600s. The expressive altar painting is a gift to the church painted by N. Larsen Stevns, 1920. The current font is from Kongsted Church. The pulpit is in Renaissance style and from ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Herslev Church

The western part of the chancel and the eastern part of the nave are the oldest parts of Herslev Church dating from the Romanesque period. The chancel and the nave were extended in the late Middle Ages, when the porch was presumably also built. When the chancel was extended, a vault was erected. The church was restored in 1881: the porch was rebuilt, the large windows were put in and a wall was put round a belfry at the ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.