Top Historic Sights in Horsens, Denmark

Explore the historic highlights of Horsens

Hjarnø Church

The church on Hjarnø is one of the smallest churches in Denmark; it currently serves 87 parishioners. The church building appears to date from the 16th century. Although it originally lacked a bell tower, one was added in 1877 with a bell dating from 1425. Within the church, the granite baptismal font is made in the Romanesque style and dates from the 12th century. The altarpiece was carved by Jens Hiernøe in 1805. Hang ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Horsens, Denmark

Boller Castle

Boller castle was first mentioned in 1350, when it was owned by Otte Limbek (Queen Margareth's trusted man). The current main building was built in 1550-1588 and reconstructed in 1759. Today it is owned by Horsens Municipality and used as a nursing home. The beautiful park and meander along the forest road through the valley to Boller water mill is open to the public.
Founded: 1550-1588 | Location: Horsens, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Antiquarium

Situated in the basement of Metropol Parasol, Antiquarium is a modern, well-presented archaeological museum with sections of ruins visible through glass partitions, and underfoot along walkways.

These Roman and Moorish remains, dating from the first century BC to the 12th century AD, were discovered when the area was being excavated to build a car park in 2003. It was decided to incorporate them into the new Metropol Parasol development, with huge mushroom-shaped shades covering a market, restaurants and concert space.

There are 11 areas of remains: seven houses with mosaic floors, columns and wells; fish salting vats; and various streets. The best is Casa de la Columna (5th century AD), a large house with pillared patio featuring marble pedestals, surrounded by a wonderful mosaic floor – look out for the laurel wreath (used by emperors to symbolise military victory and glory) and diadem (similar meaning, used by athletes), both popular designs in the latter part of the Roman Empire. You can make out where the triclinium (dining room) was, and its smaller, second patio, the Patio de Oceano.

The symbol of the Antiquarium, the kissing birds, can be seen at the centre of a large mosaic which has been reconstructed on the wall of the museum. The other major mosaic is of Medusa, the god with hair of snakes, laid out on the floor. Look out for the elaborate drinking vessel at the corners of the mosaic floor of Casa de Baco (Bacchus’ house, god of wine).