Top Historic Sights in Noarootsi, Estonia

Explore the historic highlights of Noarootsi

Noarootsi Church

Noarootsi church is the youngest fortification church in Estonia, built around 1500. It served the congregation of Swedes living on Estonia coast, but also held a defence function. Currently, it is one of the three churches in Estonia with plank roof. Most interesting artefacts inside the church are the baptising stone, baroque pulpit, limestone baroque epitaph to Minister Martin Winter. Reference: Histrodamus
Founded: 1500 | Location: Noarootsi, Estonia

Rooslepa Chapel

The ruins of Rooslepa chapel originate from the 17th century. It was originally built as a wooden chapel. The present stone chapel was built in 1834. The chapel fell apart after World War II, but the sanctuary was recommemorated in August 2007. The chapel has a brand new belfry with the ball and weathervane. The weathervane depicts a whale with its toothed mouth open. Reference: Visit Estonia
Founded: 1834 | Location: Noarootsi, Estonia

Lyckholm Museum and Saare Manor

The von Rosen family has owned Saare (Lyckholm) Manor since the Great Northern War (1720). After the Soviet occupation Gustav von Rosen acquired the manor and established a homestead museum to the old barn. The Baroque-style main building, built in the end of 18th century, provides today accomodation services. Reference: Tapio Mäkeläinen 2005. Viro - kartanoiden, kirkkojen ja kukkaketojen maa. Tammi, Helsinki, ...
Founded: 18th century | Location: Noarootsi, Estonia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lincoln Memorial

The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon and the designer of the primary statue was Daniel Chester French.

Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations.

The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, 'The Gettysburg Address' and his 'Second Inaugural Address'. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Since 2010, approximately 6 million people visit the memorial annually.