Top Historic Sights in Noarootsi, Estonia

Explore the historic highlights of Noarootsi

Noarootsi Church

Noarootsi church is the youngest fortification church in Estonia, built around 1500. It served the congregation of Swedes living on Estonia coast, but also held a defence function. Currently, it is one of the three churches in Estonia with plank roof. Most interesting artefacts inside the church are the baptising stone, baroque pulpit, limestone baroque epitaph to Minister Martin Winter. Reference: Histrodamus
Founded: 1500 | Location: Noarootsi, Estonia

Rooslepa Chapel

The ruins of Rooslepa chapel originate from the 17th century. It was originally built as a wooden chapel. The present stone chapel was built in 1834. The chapel fell apart after World War II, but the sanctuary was recommemorated in August 2007. The chapel has a brand new belfry with the ball and weathervane. The weathervane depicts a whale with its toothed mouth open. Reference: Visit Estonia
Founded: 1834 | Location: Noarootsi, Estonia

Lyckholm Museum and Saare Manor

The von Rosen family has owned Saare (Lyckholm) Manor since the Great Northern War (1720). After the Soviet occupation Gustav von Rosen acquired the manor and established a homestead museum to the old barn. The Baroque-style main building, built in the end of 18th century, provides today accomodation services. Reference: Tapio Mäkeläinen 2005. Viro - kartanoiden, kirkkojen ja kukkaketojen maa. Tammi, Helsinki, ...
Founded: 18th century | Location: Noarootsi, Estonia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.