Top Historic Sights in Pöytyä, Finland

Explore the historic highlights of Pöytyä

Pöytyä Church

The wooden cruciform church in Pöytyä was built in the year 1793 and was designed by Mikael Piimänen. Next to the church there is a rare timber enclosure from the old church. At the church square there is a clearer´s statue and on the graveyard a soldier´s statue, both designed by Aarre Aaltonen. There are also monuments of Antti Lizelius and Fr. G. Hedberg in the church area. The church milieu ...
Founded: 1793 | Location: Pöytyä, Finland

Yläne Church

The church of St. Olaf was built in the year 1782 and is located in the place of an old chapel built in 1663. The shrine of Yläne is a combination of a cruciform church and a basilica, and is seated for 600 people. It was designed by Mikael Piimänen. The organ of the church is one of the oldest in Finland. The church site, cemetery and near vicarage are defined as national built herigate by National Board of Ant ...
Founded: 1782 | Location: Pöytyä, Finland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Sirmione Castle

Sirmione castle was built near the end of the 12th century as part of a defensive network surrounding Verona. The castle was maintained and extended first as part of the Veronese protection against their rivals in Milan and later under the control of the Venetian inland empire. The massive fortress is totally surrounded by water and has an inner porch which houses a Roman and Medieval lapidary. From the drawbridge, a staircase leads to the walkways above the walls, providing a marvellous view of the harbour that once sheltered the Scaliger fleet. The doors were fitted with a variety of locking systems, including a drawbridge for horses, carriages and pedestrians, a metal grate and, more recently, double hinged doors. Venice conquered Sirmione in 1405, immediately adopting provisions to render the fortress even more secure, fortifying its outer walls and widening the harbour.

Thanks to its strategical geographical location as a border outpost, Sirmione became a crucial defence and control garrison for the ruling nobles, retaining this function until the 16th century, when its role was taken up by Peschiera del Garda.