Top Historic Sights in Adrano, Italy

Explore the historic highlights of Adrano

Adrano Norman Castle

Castle of Norman origin (Castello Normanno) is located in the centre of Adrano, built in 1070 on behalf of Norman king Roger I. They probably built the keep on the ruins of a pre-existing Muslim fortress at this site. Its purpose was to ensure control over a large portion of the surrounding Etna area. Inside the castle is the archaeological museum with antique findings of the region.
Founded: 1070 | Location: Adrano, Italy

Monastero di Santa Lucia

Monastero di Santa Lucia (Monastery of Saint Lucy) is an architectural complex in the city of Adrano. The former monastery currently serves as an elementary school. The monastery was founded in 1157 and was rebuilt in the 15th and 17th centuries. The church adjoining the monastery was erected in 1596 and was rebuilt in the late 18th century. The façade has three orders. Two bell towers rise on the sides with quadrangula ...
Founded: 1157 | Location: Adrano, Italy

Solicchiata Castle

The Solicchiata castle was built a few kilometers outside the town of Adrano around 1875 at the behest of Baron Spitaleri who intended to build a building for rural use in the Solicchiata district. It became an important industry for the production of wine, the so-called 'Solicchiata wine'. The architecture refers to the medieval style, the castle is built in lava stone, surrounded by a moat and accessible via a ...
Founded: 1875 | Location: Adrano, Italy

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.