Top Historic Sights in Šiauliai, Lithuania

Explore the historic highlights of Šiauliai

Hill of Crosses

The Hill of Crosses is a famous site of pilgrimage. The precise origin of the practice of leaving crosses on the hill is uncertain, but it is believed that the first crosses were placed on the former Jurgaičiai or Domantai hill fort after the 1831 Uprising. Over the centuries, not only crosses, but giant crucifixes, carvings of Lithuanian patriots, statues of the Virgin Mary and thousands of tiny effigiesand rosaries h ...
Founded: 1831 | Location: Šiauliai, Lithuania

Siauliai Cathedral

A Samogitian elder M. Kęsgaila built the first wooden church in Šiauliai in 1445. Later, the church was destroyed several times, burned down, until it got its present Renaissance appearance in the early 17th century. When pope John Paul II established Šiauliai Diocese, the church became a Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul. The church is painted from inside and outside with two shades of white. The Cat ...
Founded: 17th century | Location: Šiauliai, Lithuania

St. George's Church

The red brick St. George"s Church was built in 1909 as a garrison church for tsarist troops stationed in the city. The classic neo-Byzantine building was taken over by the city’s Catholics in 1919 and remodelled along less Orthodox lines in 1923. Suffering the usual Soviet fates and misfortunes, the building was used for non-religious purposes for many years before being returned to the Catholic Church and subs ...
Founded: 1909 | Location: Šiauliai, Lithuania

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Trondenes Church

Trondenes Church is the northernmost medieval stone church of Norway. Though frequently mentioned as a 13th-century church, dating based on dendrochronology places its completion shortly after 1434. Compared to the other ten north Norwegian medieval stone churches, Trondenes church is well preserved and the exterior is close to the original state. The nave is 22.6 metres long and the chancel is 13.5 metres, making it one of the largest medieval churches of rural Norway. In the late Medieval period, Trondenes served as the main church centre of Northern Norway.

The church is especially known for its rich decorations, including three gothic triptychs, one of which is made by the German Hanseatic artist Bernt Notke. The baroque pulpit is equipped with an hourglass to allow the minister to time long sermons. The organ dates from the late 18th century. In the choir section, one can see remnants of medieval frescoes.

The church is probably the third church on the site, the first stave church was built in the 11th century, the second in the 12th. The second church was fortified with stone walls and ramparts, remnants of which can be seen around the church.The church used to have a little turret, which was demolished. Now the bells are rung from a little tower in the graveyeard.