Top Historic Sights in Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Åtvidaberg

Åtvidaberg Old Church

Åtvids old church was built around 1500 and was one of Östergötland County’s largest at the time. In the late 1800s, Åtvidaberg was in need of a larger church. The old church fell into ruins and served as an open-air church for about 70 years. In the 1950s, Elof Ericsson, the director at the time, donated a large sum of money so the church could be rebuilt. The rededication took place in 1957. ...
Founded: ca. 1500 | Location: Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Björsäter Church

Björsäter church was built with the help of its parishioners in 1800. The old stave church was thought to be in bad shape and was to be torn down. The baptismal font from the late 1200s is the church’s oldest object. The pulpit is placed over the altar, which is a unique placement found in only a few churches.
Founded: 1800 | Location: Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Gärdserum Church

The neo-Gothic Gärdserum church, designed by F. W. Scholander, was one of the first of its kind in Sweden. After its completion in 1857, it was formally dedicated on 16 August by Dean J. Laruensius. The church houses some fixtures from Åtvids old church. Among them is the chancel crucifix from the 1300s.
Founded: 1851-1857 | Location: Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Rödsten

Rödsten (The Red Stone) is one of the most significant ancient monuments in Sweden. The fallos-style setting contains three stones painted with red, white and black. Rödsten dates probably from the 6th century and it has probably been erected to protect surrounding farms from the fire and depletion. The first record of Rödsten date from 1360. According the legend the stone have to be painted every year an ...
Founded: 6th century | Location: Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Yxnerum Church

Yxnerums church was built in 1802 according to the fashion of the time as a large, white barn-like building with room for half of the parish’s population. There is room for 300 persons, of which 70 in the loft. The bell tower was built much later, with the bells being mounted in 1928.
Founded: 1802-1807 | Location: Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Adelsnäs Manor

Adelsnäs (formerly known as Näs) manor was named after Johan Adelswärd, who acquired the local copper mine in 1781. The present manor building was built Theodor Adelswärd in 1916-1920. English garden and parks around the Bysjön lake are popular when open to the public. The unique detail is a “Sun Cannon”, which is installed in a red brick tower from 1853. It is a 6-pound cannon from t ...
Founded: 1916-1920 | Location: Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Hannäs Church

Bishop C. A. Cornelius dedicated Hannäs church on the fourth Sunday in Advent in 1885. It is a traditional English Gothic church with exposed rafters and trisected plank roof. Upon entering the temple, one is surprised by the bright, spacious interior. There was no altarpiece until four years after the dedication. The triumph crucifix, few wooden sculptures and font date from the Middle Ages.
Founded: 1885 | Location: Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.