Top Historic Sights in Östhammar, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Östhammar

Forsmark Manor

Forsmark Manor was built between 1767-1774 to the site of the ironworks established in the late 1500s. The Ironworks was burned down by Russians army during the Great Northern War (1719). Samuel af Ugglas bought Forsmark in 1782 and it belonged to his family near two centuries. Today the manor is owned by Forsmark Power Group.
Founded: 1767-1774 | Location: Östhammar, Sweden

Valö Church

The greystone church of Valö was built in the late 1300s and renovated in the next century. This is a fascinating church to visit, since it has scarcely been altered structurally since the Middle Ages, and contains much interesting inventory from before the Reformation. This includes a processional crucifix from the 15th century and several medieval sculptures. There is also a fine medieval triptych, unusual for a ch ...
Founded: late 1300s | Location: Östhammar, Sweden

Alunda Church

Alunda Church originates from the 1200s and it was enlarged in 1400s. It was badly damaged by fire in 1542 and 1715. The ruins were left to decay until the reconstruction made in 1780-1787. The font is the main item of inventory retained from medieval times. There are also the remains of medieval frescoes made in 1465. The altarpiece is from 1862 painted by Johan Zacharius Blackstadius.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Östhammar, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.