Top Historic Sights in Bollnäs, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Bollnäs

Växbo Kvarn

Växbo was the center of cotton manufacturing in Sweden in 1700s and 1800s. The factory, still used in summer season, is well-preserved. You can see a beautifully preserved watermill complete with dam and millpond. There are guided tours of the mill and the surrounding area. The miller’s house has been converted into a restaurant, where you can eat in idyllic surroundings. There is a mill museum where you can le ...
Founded: 18th century | Location: Bollnäs, Sweden

Onbacken

Onbacken was a complete Iron Age environment dating approximately from 100-500 AD. You can see the foundation for a “long house” (contained dwelling, barn and storage), nine tombs and part of another foundation. On Onbacken lived a large family of three generations (12-15 people). They lived by animal husbandry, farming, fishing and hunting.
Founded: 100-500 AD | Location: Bollnäs, Sweden

Bollnäs Church

Bollnäs church was originally built in the 14th and 15th centuries. One opening is known to have taken place November 3, 1468, probably concerning the church tower. Later alterations include the addition of the north and south transepts, built in 1753-1755. The church holds a larger collection of wooden medieval sculptures than any other parish church in the Nordic countries. Three of the altarpieces are major works ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Bollnäs, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.