Top Historic Sights in Färjestaden, Öland, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Färjestaden, Öland

Gråborg Castle

Gråborg is the largest ancient castle in Öland. It was built probably in the 6th century and enlarged through Middle Ages. According old tax reports dating back to the year 1450, Gråborg was owned by Vadstena abbey and functioned as a some kind of trade center. It was used for defence against Danish even in 1677. According to legend Gråborg was strongly associated with king Burislev Sverkersson who ...
Founded: 500 AD | Location: Färjestaden, Öland, Sweden

Algutsrum Church

The church of Algutstrum was originally built in the 12th century. The original tower was incorporated into the present neo-classical style church built in 1822. The most significant artefact in the church is a altarpiece made in Northern Germany in 1475. Also the font originate from Middle Ages. The Rococo-style pulpit was made in 1775 by Jonas Berggren. The Algutsrum Church stands at the highest point on Öland.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Färjestaden, Öland, Sweden

Sandby Church

There has been a church on this site in Sandby since the 12th century. The current church building, which was completed in 1863 to the designs of J F Åbom, contains some reminders of the parish’s long history. These include the original font, made of Gotland marble, and from the first half of the 13th century. Gustav Lundqvist painted the fine altarpiece which depicts Christ welcoming the little children. An e ...
Founded: 1860-1863 | Location: Färjestaden, Öland, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.