Top Historic Sights in Falkenberg, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Falkenberg

St. Lawrence's Church

The St. Lawrence’s church (S:t Laurentii kyrka) was probably built around year 1300. It was enlarged in the 15th or 16th century and burned down in the Seven Years War (1563-1570).
Founded: ca. 1300 | Location: Falkenberg, Sweden

Hagbard's Gallow

Hagbard's Gallow consists of two pair of menhirs, large upright standing stones. The monument was probably constructed during the bronze age. The stone has engravings, some discovered in the 18th Century and some in modern times. The name is related to the legend of Hagbard and Signy, as well as several other nearby remains.
Founded: 1700-500 BC | Location: Falkenberg, Sweden

Gunnarp's Church

Gunnarps church was built in 1755-1756 and is one of very few wooden churches in Halland. The interior is decorated with beautiful paintings made in 1782. The altarpiece and pulpit were made by Johannes Johansson in 1866.
Founded: 1755-1756 | Location: Falkenberg, Sweden

Svartrå Church

Svartrå church. One of Halland’s most beautiful churches, was probably built in the late 12th century. It was enlarged in the 1th century and the new chapel was added in 1757. The wooden belfry was added in 1772. The interior is characterized from the 18th century with beautiful Rococo roof paintings. The oldest item is a font made around 1200. The tabernacle date from the 16th century.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Falkenberg, Sweden

Abild Church

The oldest parts of Abild Church were built in the 12th and 13th century. It is said to previously have had the name Saint John's church after John the Baptist. Most of the inventories are from the 17th century, during which the church was prolonged to the east. The church was painted in 1767. These paintings were later covered by new paintings, until they were restored in 1953. The church has been refurbished in 1927 and ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Falkenberg, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Cháteau Comtal

The Château Comtal (Count’s Castle) is a medieval castle within the Cité of Carcassonne, the largest city in Europe with its city walls still intact. The Château Comtal has a strong claim to be called a 'Cathar Castle'. When the Catholic Crusader army arrived in 1209 they first attacked Raymond-Roger Trencavel's castrum at Bèziers and then moved on to his main stronghold at Carcassonne.

The castle with rectangular shape is separated from the city by a deep ditch and defended by two barbicans. There are six towers curtain walls.

The castle was restored in 1853 by the architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. It was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1997.