Top Historic Sights in Trollhättan, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Trollhättan

Gärdhem Church

Gärdhem Church was built in 1877-1879 and it replaced the 12th century church (the ruins are located 1km to the north). It was designed by Fredrik Wilhelm Scholander. The original white plaster was removed already in 1909. The font (13th century) was moved from the old church as well as pulpit (1695) and two bells.
Founded: 1877-1879 | Location: Trollhättan, Sweden

Koberg Castle

The first known owner of Koberg was knight Erik Nipertz in the 15th century. Later it has been owned for example by royal Vasa and Leijonhufvud (Lewenhaupt) families. The oldest eastern part of the castle dates from the mid-1400s, the middle part from 1620s and the western part from the late 1700s. The other estate buildings were built in Neo-Romantic style in 1900-1904. Today Koberg castle is the residence of Princess D& ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Trollhättan, Sweden

Väne-Åsaka Church

The oldest parts of Väne-Åsaka Church date probably from the 1100s. The bell tower was added in 1836. The oldest inventory is a font dating probably from the 13th century. The pulpit was made in 1720 and altar in 1735.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Trollhättan, Sweden

Norra Björke Church

Norra Björke Church was probably built in the early 1400s. It was enlarged in 1754 and the tower was demolished in 1817. The font dates from the 13th century and the altar from 1772. It is probably painted by master Nubbe in Gothenburg.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Trollhättan, Sweden

Gärdhem Old Church Ruins

The old church of Gärdhem was built in the 12th century. The porch was probably added in the late Middle Ages. It was enlarged in 1727-1731, but in 1860 the parish decided to build a new church 1km to south. The old church was left to decay. The ruins were excavated in 1942-1943. Today stone walls remain.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Trollhättan, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.