Roman Sites in Belgium

Neptune Roman Tower

At the end of the 3rd century Arlon was fortified with the construction of ramparts. This castrum was 800 metres in circumference with walls that were 4 metres thick and 8 metres high with two gateways and around 20 watch towers. The Neptune tower was identical to the Jupiter tower recently discovered near to the Town Hall. The small museum consists of remains of the tower which were discovered during archaeological exca ...
Founded: 200-300 AD | Location: Arlon, Belgium

Mageroy Gallo-Roman Villa

Mageroy is considered as one of the major Gallo Roman sites in Belgium. The ongoing excavations have revealed a 3 hectares agriculture complex, enclosed by a perimeter wall as well as the largest basin found North of Gaul. The main building was built in the early 2nd century AD and it was in use until the end of the 3rd century.
Founded: 2nd century AD | Location: Habay, Belgium

Tregnes Gallo-Roman Villa

The Gallo-Roman villa near Tregnes was in use from first to fourth centuries AD. It was surrounded by outbuildings, covering a surface area slightly over 6 hectares. This vast construction, whose ruins have been restored, has a very well preserved large bath installation, cellar and drainage system. Explanatory panels in three languages.
Founded: 1st century AD | Location: Viroinval, Belgium

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.