Gvozdansko Castle

Dvor, Croatia

The Gvozdansko Castle was probably built in the second half of the 15th century, due to mining rights of Croatian Zrinski noble family. The castle was first mentioned in 1488. Nikola III Zrinski and his son Nikola Šubić Zrinski frequently came to Gvozdansko in order to inspect the mines and the mint.

The Turks attempted to conquer the Gvozdansko Castle on several occasions. Three major attempts were made in 1561 by Malkoč-beg, in 1574 by Ferhad-beg, and in 1576 by Kapidži-pasha. The final siege by Ferhat-paša Sokolović with 10,000 soldiers, which was fought from 3 October 1577 to 13 January 1578, was much better prepared. That Siege of Gvozdansko ended with an Ottoman victory, after long and bloody siege. Ottomans managed to break into castle only after last defenders froze to death in harsh winter, having no wood or anything else to light the fire, on 13 January 1578.

Ottoman rule in Gvozansko lasted until 1718. Ottoman commander was stunned by the brave Croatian defenders, after witnessing frozen bodies of defenders still holding their muskets on combat positions in the ruined castle.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Dvor, Croatia
See all sites in Dvor

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Filip Paunovic (19 months ago)
Access possible from the nearby village of Rujevac (road marked, bad macadam). There is NO trail / road from the village of Gvozdansko to the fort.
- Geva - (2 years ago)
Iron is synonymous with the courage and honor of Croatian heroes. Power and Honor, the eternal guard of the Croats.
- Geva - (2 years ago)
Iron is synonymous with the courage and honor of Croatian heroes. Power and Honor, the eternal guard of the Croats.
Tajchi Tajchi (2 years ago)
Croatian nobility without a world model. Everyone should visit him and pay tribute to these brave fighters. It's a beautiful fortress just so scary that there are no signposts and a way to get there. Even the bridge over the stream could not be made to cross it and head to the fort.
Tajchi Tajchi (2 years ago)
Croatian nobility without a world model. Everyone should visit him and pay tribute to these brave fighters. It's a beautiful fortress just so scary that there are no signposts and a way to get there. Even the bridge over the stream could not be made to cross it and head to the fort.
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