Zrin Castle was first mentioned in the 13th century as a fortress ruled by the Babonić clan. Between 1328 and 1347, it was possessed by the members of Iločki family. In 1347, King Louis I the Great bestowed the fortress to the noble Šubić family who then changed their family name after it, becoming the Zrinski. It remained in their possession until the Ottoman invasion and conquest of the region, which led to the fortress falling to them on 20 October 1577. It wasn't until 1718 that the castle was retaken from the Ottomans.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Dvor, Croatia
See all sites in Dvor

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Krešimir Ivančić (2 years ago)
Magnificent place. It deserves more care about preservation and restoration.
Marin (2 years ago)
Home of the legendary nobles of Zrinski ... Maybe one day the Croatian state and its government will adequately appreciate our greats who sacrificed everything for the homeland ... Because the people who do not appreciate and do not know their history have no future ...
Filip Paunovic (2 years ago)
Turn from Divuša from the main road towards Zrin. Ignore other marked "roads"
puky puky (3 years ago)
Super
Igor Puhar (3 years ago)
Great destination for a daily trip and picnic.
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