Nejah Fortress

Senj, Croatia

The name Nehaj comes from the Croatian term Ne hajati, which means Don't care. This name was given to the hill and the Fortress by the Uskoks, who built it on the top of this hill the for defensive purposes. They gave the hill and the fortress such a name because they wanted to emphasize to the citizens of the town of Senj, and all of those that lived in the vicinity of the town of Senj that they should not care that someone will conquer this hill or the Fortress until they are there.

It was built by Croatian army general Ivan Lenković, a captain of the Uskoks, on the hill Nehaj. Finished in 1558, it was built on the remains of ruined churches, monasteries and houses which were situated outside of the walls of Senj. These buildings were scrapped since it was concluded that they would not survive anyway if they were outside the city walls, as the Ottomans would loot them or use them as housing during sieges. The fortress was mainly built to fight the Ottoman Empire, and to be used as a base for the Uskoks. The Uskoks (who built and inhabited the fort) were great enemies of the Ottomans, as they had previously taken another city called Klis, where the Uskoks used to reside. Before the fortress was built, Senj had been besieged three times, but none succeeded; after the fort was built, the fortress or Senj were not attacked again. However, the Uskoks were also known to be the enemies of the Venetians, as the Venetians were quite aggressive toward the Croatian coastal cities. The Venetians viewed them as pirates, since they would plunder and sink their ships. They were known to travel as far as Istria and plunder Venetian ships. In fact, the Venetians were so disturbed by the Uskok attacks that they had a war with Austria (which Senj was a part of at that time). One of the peace terms was the banishment of the Uskoks. The Emperor did banish the Uskoks and that was their end. However, during the hundred years that they were active they stood by their oath of vengeance towards all their enemies which they took when their former fortress of Klis was conquered by the Ottomans in 1537. The Uskoks and the Fortress successfully held the border and kept invaders away, as the fortress was never conquered or torn down. In 1592, a strong Ottoman army invaded Croatia hoping to capture Senj. Led by Telli Hasan Pasha, the beylerbey of Bosnia, the Ottomans managed to capture a number of Uskok settlements, killing and enslaving the population. However, the army was routed and dispersed in the following year. Austria was involved in war with the Ottomans and the Venetian admiral Giovanni Bembo blockaded Trieste and Rijeka (Fiume), where the pirates forwarded their booty for sale. They also erected two forts to command the passages from Senj to the open sea. In 1600, the Prince of Senj was Mickael Radic. The Duke Micheal Radic, appointed as Prince of Senj on 1 December 1600 by King Rudolf in Graz. Prince Radic was Prince of Senj. Radic family is a Native noble family from Lika region; members of the family were Uskok military leaders at the headquarters in Senj.

The fortress is 18 metres tall and 23 metres wide, and square shaped with walls averaging from 2 to 3 metres in thickness. There are five towers on top of the Fortress, and eleven large cannon openings along the walls. Inside the Fortress, there are displays of cannons and other household items, as well as a collection of costumes and weapons of the Uskoks of Senj. There is also an annual medieval festival that is held in Senj, and an important part of it is when the 'Uskoks' march up to the fortress on horseback. There are also crafting workshops and other medieval themed attractions around the fortress at this time; as well as a detailed overview of its history.

Today, the fortress serves primarily as a museum. With exhibits of weapons, clothing, drawings and models of various things from the time when the fortress was actively used. Virtually all regions of the fort are accessible. Including the toilet which dangles over the edge, but that is not available for use today.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Nehajski put 3, Senj, Croatia
See all sites in Senj

Details

Founded: 1558
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kaja Vrach (2 months ago)
The Nehaj Fortress houses the collection of the Senj Uskoks and the Senj Coastal Captaincy, the permanent exhibitions of the Senj Church through History and the City and Noble Coats of Arms of Senj.Nehaj is a symbol of the city of Senj. From the top of the tower there is a beautiful view of the Adriatic Sea.The ticket price for adults is 20kn.
Asiyah Noemi Koso (2 months ago)
Very nice castle at the top of the hill. From the top is a beautiful view of the sea, Senj and nearby islands. Around the castle there are chairs and picnic tables. The atmosphere is unique. Fortress Nehaj in Senj is beautiful and attractive. It has a rich history. It served to defend the Senj border from attacks from the sea and the mainland. Fortress Nehaj, symbol of the town of Senj, was built in 1558 under the supervision of Captain and General of Croatian Military Border Ivan Lenković. It is made up of materials destroyed by churches, monasteries and houses. Impressive building that leaves no one indifferent to anyone. It has a square shape, and it is possible to enter inside thru the wooden bridge. The walls are thick 2-3 m and the top is narrowed to the top and there are five small corner towers. The second floor held a renowned cultural and musical performances and also conferences. Part of Castle is a museum. Extremely interesting.
Noelle shx (3 months ago)
If you are thinking about visiting Nehaj Castle, I would totally recommend doing it. It costs 20 kuna for adults and is totally worth it. The view from the top is stunning. You can see Senj, the mountains and the sea. It can be pretty windy up there so i recommend takeing a light jacket to your trip. Besides there is a beautiful museum inside with lots of information about the castle and history of it. I hope you enjoy it as much as i did :)
Barney Mezey (5 months ago)
Very interesting history. The Uskoks' culture are rarely mentioned in western history books, even though they played an important role in defending them against the Ottoman Invasion. They were often left to fend for themselves and betrayed. Excellent views to Senj and the sea.
Irena (5 months ago)
Nice place to visit. Beautiful view. Inside is little restaurant, can order nice food, drinks or icecream. Recommend to visit. Takes around 30 min.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Luxembourg Palace

The famous Italian Medici family have given two queens to France: Catherine, the spouse of Henry II, and Marie, widow of Henry IV, who built the current Luxembourg palace. Maria di Medici had never been happy at the Louvre, still semi-medieval, where the fickle king, did not hesitate to receive his mistresses. The death of Henry IV, assassinated in 1610, left the way open for Marie's project. When she became regent, she was able to give special attention to the construction of an imposing modern residence that would be reminiscent of the Palazzo Pitti and the Boboli Gardens in Florence, where she grew up. The development of the 25-hectare park, which was to serve as a jewel-case for the palace, began immediately.

The architect, Salomon de Brosse, began the work in 1615. Only 16 years later was the palace was completed. Palace of Luxembourg affords a transition between the Renaissance and the Classical period.

In 1750, the Director of the King's Buildings installed in the wing the first public art-gallery in France, in which French and foreign canvases of the royal collections are shown. The Count of Provence and future Louis XVIII, who was living in Petit Luxembourg, had this gallery closed in 1780: leaving to emigrate, he fled from the palace in June 1791.

During the French Revolution the palace was first abandoned and then moved as a national prison. After that it was the seat of the French Directory, and in 1799, the home of the Sénat conservateur and the first residence of Napoleon Bonaparte, as First Consul of the French Republic. The old apartments of Maria di Medici were altered. The floor, which the 80 senators only occupied in 1804, was built in the middle of the present Conference Hall.

Beginning in 1835 the architect Alphonse de Gisors added a new garden wing parallel to the old corps de logis, replicating the look of the original 17th-century facade so precisely that it is difficult to distinguish at first glance the old from the new. The new senate chamber was located in what would have been the courtyard area in-between.

The new wing included a library (bibliothèque) with a cycle of paintings (1845–1847) by Eugène Delacroix. In the 1850s, at the request of Emperor Napoleon III, Gisors created the highly decorated Salle des Conférences, which influenced the nature of subsequent official interiors of the Second Empire, including those of the Palais Garnier.

During the German occupation of Paris (1940–1944), Hermann Göring took over the palace as the headquarters of the Luftwaffe in France, taking for himself a sumptuous suite of rooms to accommodate his visits to the French capital. Since 1958 the Luxembourg palace has been the seat of the French Senate of the Fifth Republic.