Korcula Cathedral

Korčula, Croatia

St. Mark’s Cathedral is probably the most important building in the Korcula Old Town. It is built in Gothic-Renaissance style, completed in the 15th century at the place of other church from 13th century. It was built by local masters and craftsman of stone masonry, very well known in renaissance and baroque Dubrovnik and Venice.

Most famous among them was stone mason Marko Andijic who completed the cathedral’s tower and cupola (1481) as well as elegant ciborium above the main altar. Cathedral’s facade is decorated with the truly beautiful fluted rose and various relief and statues (photos), while the main door – portal is framed by statues of Adam and Eve and figures of lions. Inside the Cathedral there are two Tintoretto’s paintings.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Hegedus (11 months ago)
The church was beautiful. The bell tower was also really good, at first there was a narrow stair spiral but after that the stairs were wider. The panorama at the top is good, you can see everything. You have to pay for the church and the tower separately, they cost around 25kuna for adults and 15kuna for children. Overall, I would say that it is worth it to see both of them, especially the church.
John Bethke (12 months ago)
Worth the climb and the entry fee to see the whole city.
Andrzej Rapczyński (2 years ago)
Keep in mind there are two different entrances to the church itself and bell tower. Bell tower is worth visiting, however entrance fee to the church must be a joke.
Ivan Golović (2 years ago)
My opinion is church itself is beautiful but consecrated place of worship shouldn't have tickets at the entrance.
Ivan Golović (2 years ago)
My opinion is church itself is beautiful but consecrated place of worship shouldn't have tickets at the entrance.
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