Emile Chenon Museum describes the findings from the excavations of the “oppidum” Gallo of 18 ha. extension under a dam called Mediolanum Chateaumeillant predecessor. In addition, the museum works in a building from the XIV to XVI.

The museum was created in 1961 by archaeologist Jacques Gourvest and explains much about the gala and civilization Gallo-Roman period in central France. The excavations have allowed to collect a large amount of pottery of exceptional quality, a total of more than 350 amphorae italics, ceramics Nimes and Samos; Prehistoric flint tools, grinders, urns, statues, sarcophagi and more.

There are also displays of old crafts, and a huge press with a huge beam that reminds us that we are in a wine-growing region. On the second floor is a sample of fossils and minerals. The hall remains intact medieval building elements such as mullioned windows and stone benches. The mansion belonged to the family of royal notaries and was known as “Le Petit Chateau”.

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Founded: 1961
Category: Museums in France

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Héba-Aude LECUYER (5 months ago)
Beau musée sur l'histoire de Châteaumeillant en particulier à l'époque gauloise et gallo-romaine se basant sur les découvertes uniques en Europe et les fouilles archéologiques de Châteaumeillant commencée par Émile Chénon et continuer jusqu'à aujourd'hui. Permet de connaître un peu plus l'histoire antique du Berry riche dans la région (Avaricum, Argentomagus, ...)
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