Saint Jovan Bigorski Monastery

Mavrovo and Rostuša, North Macedonia

The Monastery of Saint Jovan Bigorski is dedicated to St. John the Baptist. One of its most valuable treasures is the iconostasis, created by Petre Filipovski, and considered one of the finest examples of wood-carved iconostases.

According to its 1833 chronicle, the monastery was built in 1020 by Ivan I Debranin. The Ottomans destroyed the monastery in the 16th century, but it was restored in 1743 by the monk Ilarion, who also constructed a number of cells for monks. The archimandrite Arsenius further expanded the monastery between 1812 and 1825. The historical record also mentions a monk Iov, recognized by some researchers as the future educator Yoakim Karchovski.

Most of the old monastery complex was destroyed by a fire in 2009, while the new sections of the complex and church were saved. Reconstruction of the old sections began in May 2010 with the goal of restoring the buildings as closely as possible to their original style.

The monastery has a large collection of holy relics including John the Baptist, Clement of Ohrid, Lazarus of Bethany, Saint Stephen, Saint Nicholas, Saint Barbara, Paraskevi of Rome, Tryphon, Respicius, and Nympha, and part of the Holy Cross.

Another valuable monastery treasure is an icon dating from 1020 with supposedly miraculous healing power.

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Details

Founded: 1020
Category: Religious sites in North Macedonia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nikola Spasovski (3 months ago)
Peaceful place where you can truly connect with your soul. Wonderful!
Arshan Batros (3 months ago)
All i can say that the location of this monastery is quite unique.Its up to mountains so i wish,I had time to live there for a while.Btw,our guide monk trainee Angel was so nice.I have felt ashamed to steal from lunch and coffee time.I love every pieces of this monastery.Recommended to everyone
Martin Michalik (5 months ago)
Talking to local people, it takes anywhere between 6 month to 3 years to become a monk. You need to learn how to love, give without expeftions, help people in need, etc. These are only some basic predisposition on your path to enligthmet
Suzana Sich (5 months ago)
Has a long history and tradition of 1000 years. The beautiful scenery, the remarkable iconostasis in the church, the bell towers' melody - all add to its uniqueness.
Aleksandar Ampovski (11 months ago)
Holy place. Worth to visit.
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