Château Lafite Rothschild

Pauillac, France

Situated in the wine-producing village of Pauillac, the estate was the property of Gombaud de Lafite in 1234. In the 17th century, the property was purchased by the Ségur family, including the 16th century manor house that still stands. Although vines almost certainly already existed on the site, around 1680, Jacques de Ségur planted the majority of the vineyard.

In the early 18th century, Nicolas-Alexandre, marquis de Ségur refined the wine-making techniques of the estate, and introduced his wines to the upper echelons of European society.

Following the French Revolution, the period known as Reign of Terror led to the execution of Nicolas Pierre de Pichard on 30 June 1794, bringing an end to the Ségur family's ownership of the estate which became public property. In 1797 the vineyards were sold to a group of Dutch merchants.

The first half of the 19th century saw Lafite in the hands of the Vanlerberghe family and the wine improved more, including the great vintages of 1795, 1798 and 1818. In 1868 the Château was purchased by Baron James Mayer Rothschild for 4.4 million francs, and the estate became Château Lafite Rothschild. Rothschild, however, died just three months after purchasing Lafite. The estate then became the joint property of his three sons: Alphonse, Gustave and Edmond Rothschild.

The 20th century has seen periods of success and difficulty, coping with post-phylloxera vines, and two world wars. During the Second World War the Château was occupied by the German army, and suffered heavily from plundering of its cellars. Succeeding his uncle Élie de Rothschild, Lafite has been under the direction of Éric de Rothschild since 1974.

The vineyard is one of the largest in the Médoc at 107 hectares, and produces around 35,000 cases annually.

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Address

Lafite, Pauillac, France
See all sites in Pauillac

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Manuela Claudia Mengin (4 years ago)
rlly bad I hate it go to the other
Stefan Stoev (5 years ago)
Good
Fabio Menni (5 years ago)
Top
Ricky Campbell (5 years ago)
A paradise of paradise is from the moment the berry blossoms to the outstanding retrospect of learning the process this is definitely a check off the bucket list great time great tastings great ambience great scenery must come bring the family!
Marc Ouellet (8 years ago)
Superb from the outside, wish I could have done the tour and tested the wines!
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