Castell y Bere

Gwynedd, United Kingdom

Castell y Bere is a Welsh castle near Llanfihangel-y-pennant in Gwynedd, Wales. Constructed by Llywelyn the Great in the 1220s, the stone castle was intended to maintain his authority over the local people and to defend the south-west part of the princedom of Gwynedd. In 1282, war with Edward I of England resulted in the death of Llywelyn's grandson, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, and Castell y Bere fell to English forces.

Edward I expanded the castle further and established a small town beside it. In 1294 the Welsh leader Madog ap Llywelyn mounted a major revolt and the castle was besieged and apparently burnt. Edward did not repair it and it became ruined. Today it is in the hands of Cadw and operated as a tourist attraction.

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Details

Founded: 1220s
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andy Mason (2 years ago)
Loved it. Interesting castle, not too far or strenuous to walk to it from the parking area. Fantastic views once in the castle. I'll be back!!!
Mark Adamson (Gingerwinger) (2 years ago)
Small tight road leading to a small parking area off the road. Short walk through the woods to the entrance to the castle. Not a great walking surface for some. Looks like it was a while since much has been spent on this castle from Cadw as the stairs etc have seen better days. Great views through the valley but could do with more info about the castle and the layout if known inside the castle.
A DP (2 years ago)
Very interesting place to view; Free entry, but the acces is via a narrow single lane route. Make sure you drive slowly (probably at 30mph even if your navigation shows the speed limit of 60mph); worth the effort. Once you reach the entrance, the remaining of the building is around 5 to 8 minutes walk and around 10 minutes of viewing. Sad to see the structure is dying (not maintained).
Don Constance (2 years ago)
Formerly important castle now an isolated ruin accessed via a steep, rough path and then wooden steps. Free to enter and wander around. I had the entire place to myself for a while on a weekday afternoon in May. Car park has space for maybe half a dozen cars, reached along narrow country lanes.
Lucinda (2 years ago)
Really interesting place to visit. Enough parking for around 10 cars, there are no facilities here. The views are stunning and there is plenty to see and read the information boards. Some nice walks close by too.
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