Rauna Castle Ruins

Rauna, Latvia

Rauna Castle ruins was the principal residence of the Archbishopric of Riga in which at for certain period each year it was visited the Archbishop with his entourage. The first mention of Rauna Castle date back to 1381, although historians agree that it may have been built here even earlier. 18th century sources mention the castle as being erected in 1262, following a proposal of Albert Suerbeer, Archbishop of Riga. It is noted that the castle was one of the most important centres of the archdiocese.

The biggest reconstructions occurred under the reign of Archbishop Jasper Linde. One of the new towers built was named Garais Kaspars (Tall Jasper), after the archbishop, and a small settlement developed around the castle, which later became the village of Rauna.

The devastation of the castle started in 1556 with attacks by the Livonian Order, which lasted until the end of the Livonian War. The worst damage to the castle occurred from 1657 to 1658, during the Second Northern War between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Swedish Empire. The castle was deserted after that and slowly turned to ruins. In 1683 the king of Sweden ordered the destruction of anything that resembled a fortress around the castle, so all towers were demolished. Today the Rauna Castle ruins are preserved. Many walls and even the bases of the towers remain.

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Address

Rīgas iela 1, Rauna, Latvia
See all sites in Rauna

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ilze Sirante (2 years ago)
One of must see places in Rauna.
Uzhac Uzhacny (3 years ago)
Must see can go up and see near suroundings.
Arnis Šinka (3 years ago)
Could imagine knights walking round
Marcis Stucis (3 years ago)
Best Latvian food!
Peteris Vegis (4 years ago)
Impressive ruins of medieval castle. Photos and information about castle located on the tower.
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