Antonievo-Siysky Monastery

Arkhangelsk, Russia

The Russian Orthodox Antonievo-Siysky Monastery was founded by Saint Anthony of Siya deep in the woods, 90 km to the south of Kholmogory, in 1520. Currently the monastery is located in Kholmogorsky District of Arkhangelsk Oblast in Russia, inside the nature protected area, Siysky Zakaznik.

Following the saint's death in 1556, the monastery grew on the salt trade with Western Europe and developed into one of the foremost centres of Christianity in the Russian North. Ivan the Terrible and his son Feodor granted it important privileges and much land. By 1579, the monastery owned 50 versts of ploughlands stretching towards Kargopol.

In 1599, Boris Godunov exiled his political opponent Feodor Romanov to this remote monastery. While many of his relatives were starved to death in other cloisters, Feodor took monastic vows and was eventually raised to the dignity of hegumen (abbot) of the monastery. Later he became the Patriarch of Moscow, and his son Mikhail established the Romanov dynasty of Russian tsars.

In the 17th century, the monastery continued to prosper. The large Trinity cathedral was constructed over the years 1587–1608. The tent-like church and refectory were completed by 1644, and the belfry was added in 1652. The monastic library was one of the richest in Russia and included such books as the Siysky Gospel from 1339 and the 16th-century album of 500 Western religious etchings adapted to Eastern Orthodox canonical requirements. Its treasury was famed for its collection of medieval jewelry. In 1764, the monastery owned more than 3,300 male peasants.

In 1923, the monastery was disbanded. Both library and treasury were taken to Moscow or Arkhangelsk. The medieval buildings were used as a sanatorium and a kolkhoz. The monks were readmitted to the cloister in 1992 and immediately began emergency repair works.

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Details

Founded: 1520
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Bernard Antoine (2 months ago)
Being the only one baptized under the name of Saint Anthony of Siya, this is what led me to choose this man who became a saint and whose feast is on December 7th. He left Archangelsk, where he was originally from, to go to Novgorod in the service of a rich merchant who gave him his daughter for wife. Widowed very early, he entered a monastery in Kensk. After a few years, it leaves it and sinks into the forests near the White Sea, living only on mushrooms and wild berries. The greatest loneliness is never totally ignored. The prince of Moscow, having learned of the disciples who lived around Saint Anthony, built a monastery for them. Saint Anthony ruled him, then he took refuge once again in an inaccessible place from which his monks removed him so that he could resume the leadership of the community, despite his great age, so great was his holiness. He died in 1556 in his 79th year.
Georgiy Gubanov (4 months ago)
A place of strength, peace and grandeur permeates every centimeter of the monastery's territory.
Алексей Матвеев (5 months ago)
This is where our Path ended at 630 km.
Igor Demidov (6 months ago)
Pros: a charming, picturesque place. Exhibition about the history of the restoration of the monastery. Of the minuses: there are not so many objects to be examined, a terrible rural toilet of the "pit" type, many signs "no access", you cannot even approach the water on the territory.
Александр Антонов (6 months ago)
It is a very beautiful place, but a lot of work and money is still needed. The lakes are wonderful. Recommend.
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