Telsiai Cathedral

Telšiai, Lithuania

The Cathedral of St. Anthony of Padua is a seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Telšiai. The history of the church dates back to 1624 when Deputy Chancellor of Lithuania Paweł Stefan Sapieha established a Cistercian monastery and built a wooden church on the Insula hill in the centre of Telšiai. A new spacious brick church was constructed between 1762 and 1794. The tower was built in 1859. In 1893 architect Piotras Serbinovičius designed the fence and gates of the churchyard. After the establishment of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Telšiai in 1926, the church became a cathedral. Three Bishops of Telšiai, Justinas Staugaitis,Vincentas Borisevičius and Pranciškus Ramanauskas, are buried in the cathedral's tomb.

The cathedral reflects features of Baroque and Classicism. Its plan is rectangular. It has one tower and a three-wall apse. The cathedral's nave is bordered by two aisles, separated by piers. Artist Jurgis Mažeika designed seven altars. Telšiai Cathedral is the only church in Lithuania which has a two-storey altar.

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Details

Founded: 1762
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valdas Gaule (2 years ago)
Perfectly restored, amazing acoustics
Almantas Zaveckas (3 years ago)
One of the most beautiful churches in Samogitia, great views from the top of the tower.
Ed R (3 years ago)
Very nice
Nana Khunchuka (3 years ago)
lovely view and sightseeing
Justas Rumbutis (3 years ago)
Best place to play 'pig' ball game, because there are squares always ready to be played in!
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