Tikhvin Assumption Monastery

Tikhvin, Russia

The Tikhvin Assumption Monastery is a Russian Orthodox monastery founded in 1560. It hosts the icon of the Theotokos of Tikhvin, one of the most venerated Russian icons. According to the tradition, the icon of the Theotokos of Tikhvin was discovered in 1383 at the current location of the monastery. A wooden church was built to accommodate the icon. The consequent wooden churches burned to the ground three times, until in 1507 the construction of a stone church started by the order of Vasily III, the Grand Prince of Moscow. In 1560, the monastery was founded and built as a fortress, since at the time it was located close to the Swedish border, and could be used in the defense purposes. In 1610, during the Time of Troubles, the monastery was looted by Polish troops, and subsequently it was occupied by Swedish forces until 1613. In the 1920s, after the Russian Revolution, the monastery was closed, but the icon was still held there. After World War II, the Tikhvin Town Museum was organized in the monastery. In 1995, the monastery was transferred to Russian Orthodox Church.

In 1941, during World War II, for a month Tikhvin was occupied by German troops, who looted the monastery and, in particular, took the icon to Pskov, and in 1944 transferred it to Riga. The icon eventually was taken out of Russia for safety by a Russian Orthodox bishop from Kolka parish. In the period between 1949 and 2004 the icon was stored in Chicago. It was returned to the monastery in 2004.

The oldest building of the monastery is the Assumption Church, built between 1507 and 1515, before the monastery was founded.It is a five-dome church with three apses, typical for the 16th century Russian architecture. From three sides, the church is surrounded by covered galleries. The interior is covered by frescoes.

The refectory of the monastery dates from 1581 and contains a church. This is a massive two-story building. The belfry of the monastery has an unusual shape with a number of domes and was constructed in 1600. The cells were built in the end of the 17th century. The monastery has an approximately rectangular shape and is surrounded by the wall with towers.

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Details

Founded: 1560
Category: Religious sites in Russia

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Spyridon Voulgaris (3 years ago)
Amazing spiritual place with the Holy Icon of Virgin Mary.
Maxim Korotkov (3 years ago)
Great
Mike (3 years ago)
One of the most charming and beautiful monastery I've visited. Delicious bakery and eatery inside. Definitely worth the visit. No entrance fee.
Viktoriya Po (3 years ago)
Несколько раз приезжала. Рядом с монастырём есть красивый пруд. Фрески потрясающей красоты. Всегда много посетителей цены в лавках расчитаны на туристов. Есть трапезная. На улице в сувенирных киосках продаётся свежая, вкусная выпечка. Есть гостиница для паломников.
Елена Столбовская (4 years ago)
Приезжайте. Красиво. Тихо. Умиротворенно. Очень вкусные калитки с брусникой.
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