Ekshärad Church

Ekshärad, Sweden

Ekshärad Church was built between 1686-1688 and it is a timbered cruciform church with a shingle roof. There is a font from the 13th century, raredos and sacrament cabinet from the Middle Ages. On the organ loft you can see a series of funny portaits of kings. Ekshärad church is famous for its beautiful forged crosses of which the most are symbolising the tree of life.

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Address

932, Ekshärad, Sweden
See all sites in Ekshärad

Details

Founded: 1686-1688
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

www.varmland.se

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alison Smith (4 years ago)
Beautiful church
Mats Clinth (4 years ago)
Vacker gammal träkyrka
Rick en Gerliza Ruttentuttels (4 years ago)
Mooi en goed onderhouden kerk. Veel historische stukken waarbij helaas alleen uitleg in het Zweeds staat geschreven echter als het om een bijdrage gaat er wel Duits of Engels staat. De begraafplaats is bijzonder met levensbomen die zelfs uit 1800 zijn. Mooi om een bezoek te brengen als je in de buurt bent.
Jeroen Travel (5 years ago)
Beatiful old wooden church. The entrance is free and certainly a worth a look.
Florian Hergenhahn (6 years ago)
It's not the biggest but not the smartest church. I like the garden and the structure.
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