Järämä Fortification Camp

Enontekiö, Finland

Järämä fortification camp was originally built by Germans during the Second World War (1942-1944). It’s part of a larger network of fortifications (also known as Sturmbock-Stellung to the Germans) to protect the harbours of the Arctic Ocean. Järämä camp is dug partly into the bedrock. No real battles were ever fought in this fortification camp.

Today there are renovated trenches, shooting points for machine guns and one anti-tank cannon firing point. In 1997 the museum was opened to exhibit life and events in Lapland during the war and after it. There’s also a café.

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Details

Founded: 1942-1944 (Museum 1997)
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Mysti S (17 months ago)
If you're interested in WW2 history, then this is definitely worth the visit
jussi vuoti (2 years ago)
Ok ++
Mikko Moisio (2 years ago)
Easy to reach
Ville Tawaststjerna (3 years ago)
Very nice! Good service and great exhibition!
Kristiina Rajamäki (3 years ago)
This WWII museum was a very pleasant surprise, a large maze of trenches and restored bunkers outdoors amidst beautiful natural surroundings (~ 1.2 km of walkable trenches). One could really get a feel of the soldiers daily life here. The museum had also some exhibitions indoors and a cafe. A perfect stop on your roadtrip, and a good bit of excercise as a bonus!
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