Siida is home to the Sámi Museum and Northern Lapland Nature Centre. Siida arranges exhibitions on Sámi culture and the nature of Northern Lapland. In addition, Siida has an open-air museum open in the summers, which was originally known as the Inari Sámi Museum. The first buildings were moved to the museum grounds in 1960. The 7-hectare (17-acre) area has nearly 50 sites of interest related to Lapland's nature and the Sámi and their culture. Furthermore, the area is where the earliest settlers in Northern Lapland lived and archaeological finds from approximately 9,000 years ago have been found.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Inarintie 46, Inari, Finland
See all sites in Inari

Details


Category: Museums in Finland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vincent Yang (2 years ago)
Good place to help us to understand how local residence life is.
Simon Errock (2 years ago)
Excellent museum displaying most aspects of the Sami culture & lifestyle, well presented & with English explanations. Cafe has a range of sandwiches & hot food available at reasonable prices.
Rowena Harding (2 years ago)
Wonderful museum, I could have easily spent all day in the outdoor museum and the indoor presentations were interesting and varied. The cafe had good cake. Your ticket allows all day entry so you can go away and come back.
Lorenz E. (2 years ago)
Very interesting museum, I did learn a lot about Sami culture. Especially the outside exhibition is stunning.
Petri Mentu (2 years ago)
Beautiful handcrafts to purchase in the aula. Also very friendly staff to help you out with your trip to the north. Ask anything and you will be guided. Most languages supported. Museum about northern nature and indigenous people living there is very important and interesting.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Ängsö Castle

Ängsö Castle was first named as "Engsev" in a royal charter by king Canute I of Sweden (r. 1167-1196), in which he stated that he had inherited the property after his father Eric IX of Sweden. Until 1272, it was owned by the Riseberga Abbey, and then taken over by Gregers Birgersson.

From 1475 until 1710, it was owned by the Sparre family. The current castle was built as a fortress by riksråd Bengt Fadersson Sparre in the 1480s. In 1522, Ängsö Castle was taken after a siege by king Gustav Vasa, since its owner, Fadersson's son Knut Bengtsson, sided with Christian II of Denmark. However, in 1538 it was given by the king to Bengtsson's daughter Hillevi Knutsdotter, who was married to Arvid Trolle.

In 1710, the castle was taken over by Carl Piper and Christina Piper. Ängsö Castle was owned by the Piper family from 1710 until 1971, and is now owned by the Westmanna foundation. The castle building itself was made into a museum in 1959 and was made a listed building in 1965. It is currently opened to visitors during the summers.

The castle is a cubical building in four stores made by stone and bricks. The lower parts is preserved from the middle ages. It was redecorated and expanded in the 1630s. The 4th storey as well as the roof is from the expansion of Carl Hårleman from 1740-41. It gained its current appearance in the 1740s.