Siida is home to the Sámi Museum and Northern Lapland Nature Centre. Siida arranges exhibitions on Sámi culture and the nature of Northern Lapland. In addition, Siida has an open-air museum open in the summers, which was originally known as the Inari Sámi Museum. The first buildings were moved to the museum grounds in 1960. The 7-hectare (17-acre) area has nearly 50 sites of interest related to Lapland's nature and the Sámi and their culture. Furthermore, the area is where the earliest settlers in Northern Lapland lived and archaeological finds from approximately 9,000 years ago have been found.

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Address

Inarintie 46, Inari, Finland
See all sites in Inari

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Category: Museums in Finland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vincent Yang (4 months ago)
Good place to help us to understand how local residence life is.
Simon Errock (5 months ago)
Excellent museum displaying most aspects of the Sami culture & lifestyle, well presented & with English explanations. Cafe has a range of sandwiches & hot food available at reasonable prices.
Rowena Harding (6 months ago)
Wonderful museum, I could have easily spent all day in the outdoor museum and the indoor presentations were interesting and varied. The cafe had good cake. Your ticket allows all day entry so you can go away and come back.
Lorenz E. (7 months ago)
Very interesting museum, I did learn a lot about Sami culture. Especially the outside exhibition is stunning.
Petri Mentu (9 months ago)
Beautiful handcrafts to purchase in the aula. Also very friendly staff to help you out with your trip to the north. Ask anything and you will be guided. Most languages supported. Museum about northern nature and indigenous people living there is very important and interesting.
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