Nuuk Cathedral

Nuuk, Greenland

Nuuk Cathedral (Greenlandic: Annaassisitta Oqaluffia) was built from 1848 to 1849. It was paid for in full by Karen Oersted’s Fund. When it was consecrated it became the church of Nuuk congregation, replacing the responsibilities of many older Nuuk churches, the oldest of which was from 1758.

Until May 6, 1993, the Cathedral of Copenhagen was also the Cathedral of Greenland, but when the Law of Greenland's Church and School became effective on May 6, 1993, the church officially became the Cathedral of Greenland. The first bishop of Greenland in 616 years was Kristian Mørk who was ordained in 1994, the previous bishop of Greenland was Álfur Last-Bishop in 1378. Mørk vacated the seat the next year, and 39-year-old Greenland native Sofie Petersen became bishop of Greenland. Petersen is the second female bishop in Denmark. The annex building next to the cathedral is the actual seat of the bishop of Greenland, the cathedral itself does not hold the seat.

Originally the church was constructed with so called half timbering, a timber framing for soapstone and talc. Later the building was externally paneled with red wood panels. In conjunction with the outside paneling, the interior was paneled as well, the inside panels are painted white. The wooden church tower is a later add-on, it was erected in 1928. The two big brass candelabras at the altar are a gift from the Church of Norway.

The Statue of Hans Egede is located on the hill above the church. The statue is a 1921 copy of the statue in front of the Marble Church in Copenhagen. In front of the cathedral is a bronze bust of the celebrated organist Jonathan Petersen. Peterson was a well-known writer of psalms, as well as a gifted organist.

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Details

Founded: 1848-1849
Category: Religious sites in Greenland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Nathan Biggs (2 years ago)
Savior? I hardly know 'er!
Walker Scott (2 years ago)
thought it was a barn but realized it was a place of worship 4 hours into the sermon
Steve Joe (2 years ago)
great place
Samí Warrior (2 years ago)
I have yet to go. I love Greenland.
Conrad Egbert (3 years ago)
Apparently called the cathederal, this wooden church is pretty much a landmark in Nuuk. Situated next to the National Museum and the old harbour, it's one of those things you chance upon. If you've got limited time in Nuuk, you can give this a pass, however due to it's excellent location most people end up seeing it anyway.
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