Giske Church

Giske, Norway

Giske Church was built of white marble in the 12th century. The origin of the marble is unclear, but it was brought to the island by boat. Where it came from before that is unknown. Today the walls are covered by chalk on the outside and plaster on the inside, so that the marble is only visible in a few places, all on the outside. The architectural style is Norman.

The church was originally a family chapel consisting of the nave and chancel, but it has been refurbished several times over the centuries. The most extensive renovation was carried out in the 1750s (initiated by Hans Strøm), and most of the interior today can be dated back to this renovation, carved by the local craftsman Jakob Sørensøn Giskegaard (1734-1827).

The church is open for guided tours during the summer season.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Bjørn Lien (6 years ago)
Historisk perle, en opplevelse
Jon olalla (6 years ago)
Encantadora iglesia. Con mucha historia
Avi Noam (6 years ago)
כנסיה עתיקה ונדחת, מוקפת קברים עתיקים עוד יותר וקבר של ויקינג הזוכה להדגשה. אטרקציה מקומית לא פחות מחוף הים הסמוך.
Yahav Rotbard (8 years ago)
Very old place
Ian Done (8 years ago)
Beautiful calm place
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