Eidsborg Stave Church

Eidsborg, Norway

Eidsborg Stave Church is one of the best preserved Norwegian stave churches. The church was probably built between 1250-1300. The church is dedicated to the traveller's patron, St. Nicholas of Bari. It was partly reconstructed in the 19th century. The chorus was demolished in 1826. The new choir dates to the period 1845-50. The reconstruction work did not affect the structure or the shape of the church. It was restored in 1927 when painted figures and ornaments dating from the Renaissance and old murals from the 17th century were revealed.

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Founded: 1250-1300
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Anita Nagy (12 months ago)
Meseszép, elvarázsol a mult. Ezt látni kell. Hihetetlen élmény volt. ❤️
Cederik Leeuwe (2 years ago)
Secluded and beautiful location and gorgeous stave church. The place doesn't feel like a tourist magnet and the access to the church's grounds is free and unbarred. Lovely. (Little reminder : like all stave churches – or legally, any building – drone use is not permitted in its direct vicinity fly responsibly and according to laws in place).
Toke Ullvar Beyer-Clausen (2 years ago)
We spent three hours there. Something to inspire the whole family. The canal park is great for children and playful adults. The museum is interesting and the café has good coffee with Norwegian "snacks". The stave church is amazing and the guides are friendly. (Tip: Ask to see the runic inscriptions to the left of the south door. Most stave churches have them, but sadly most guides forget to mention them.)
jan erik johannessen (2 years ago)
One of the small stave churches in Norway with quite a few interesting stories. Well worth a visit.
Frank de Meer (4 years ago)
Nice typical stave church in Norway. Looks in perfect shape. Not a lot of parking space but who needs pace for a bike :-)
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