Heddal Stave Church

Notodden, Norway

Heddal stave church is a triple nave stave church and is Norway's largest stave church. It was constructed at the beginning of the 13th century. After the reformation, the church was in a very poor condition, and a restoration took place during 1849 - 1851. However, because the restorers lacked the necessary knowledge and skills, yet another restoration was necessary in the 1950s. The interior is marked by the period after the Lutheran Reformation in 1536-1537 and is for a great part a result of the restoration that took place in the 1950s. What is known is that five peasants together with Sira Eilif built the church.

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Details

Founded: c. 1210
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike Groth (2 years ago)
Great and impressive church with beautiful carvings. Nice giftshop and exhibition
Alicja Janczur (2 years ago)
This is a beauliful old church. Amazing
K Emm (2 years ago)
Beautiful old wooden church. Ive never seen anything quite like it. I think it ( or any if the stave churches) are a must when visiting Norway. We went on a Sunday in September and it wasnt busy. Website says it open daily until 20 September. Call ahead if you are coming after the season....
Feral Escape (2 years ago)
Incredible 13th century stave church! Built around the time the area was converted from paganism to Christianity, so there are still a lot of pagan symbols and characteristic in the design. Smells wonderfully OLD. Plus Notodden is a lovely little town. We liked it so much we hung around all day in our van.
Andréas S. Eriksson (2 years ago)
This is a place with so much history. This is the biggest of the remaining 28 stave church in Norway and it is well visited. Be prepared to see lots of busses and people. To enter the church you must by a ticket and with that comes the possibility to have a private guided tour of the church. Just ask some of the guides outside and they will show you.
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