Tradition has it that the original Monastery of Valamo was founded in the 12th century or no later than the 14th century. New Valamo or New Valaam is an Orthodox monastery in Heinävesi. The monastery was established in 1940, when some 190 monks from Valamo Monastery in Karelia were evacuated from their old abode on a group of islands in Lake Laatokka (Ladoga) to Eastern Finland. The old Valamo Monastery was quite soon after the outbreak of the Winter War occupied by the armed forces of the Soviet Union.

After a temporary dwelling place the monks decided to settle down in Heinävesi in Eastern Finland. The choice fell on a mansion in Papinniemi, Heinävesi, after the monks had found there, quite surprisingly, an icon of St. Sergius and St. Herman, the founders of Valaam (Valamo) monastery in the 12th century. The monks considered this to be a sign from God. Having received evacuees from the Konevsky (Konevitsa) and Pechenga (Petsamo) monasteries, it is now the only monastery for men of the Finnish Orthodox Church.

There is a museum in Valamo monastery exhibiting the life in Orthodox monasteries from 18th century to present. The exhibition also shows the rebuilding of the monastery in Heinävesi, its ecclesiastical and social relationships and its publishing activities. The liturgical items reveal the high level of technical and artistic expertise that the Russian craft and design industry had achieved.

Only some of the monastery’s treasures are on display. These artefacts are mainly from the 19th century, although some are even from the 17th and 18th centuries. Similar objects are usually not seen, even in church, as the communion objects, the benediction crosses and the ecclesiastical textiles are stored in the sanctuary and the storage areas. The old artefacts are still in use, even though most of them are rarely used.

The cultural centre also hosts special collections on a temporary basis. The Monastery of Valamo has its own restaurant, accommodation and diverse tourist services.

References: Wikipedia, Museums of Southern Savo

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1940
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

Interesting Sites Nearby

User Reviews

Grigorii Torkel (5 months ago)
A great place to find peace in a hasty world for both believers and non believers. Many come back from the monastery feeling renewed and happy. It is also a great place for those seeking to come closer to God by providing a calm and prayerful atmosphere. Valamo monastary is home to several miracle working icons and many relics. It also has fascinating history and tradition. The monastery is located in a scenic area surrounded by forests and next to a lake. It provides accommodations and the monastery's trapeza has great food. It also has a winery, gift shop, educational center that provides a wide range of courses throughout the year, a library, as well as several exhibitions.
Azez Fahme (5 months ago)
Great and good place to rest and relax
Alice B (6 months ago)
A peaceful, beautiful area of Finland steeped in history. Well worth a visit, if you remain respectful of the atmosphere and culture. Rules include silence between 10pm and 6am, no photography during services, and no photos of any personnel or those living there. I would also recommend coming closer to winter for the quieter season. Food is served from 6am until 6pm (9pm on Fridays and Saturdays). There's a range of pastries and sandwiches, or the lunch/dinner buffet. The latter is more expensive but the ingredients are quality. The local cat is also very friendly and worth watching out for ☺️
Jori Brander (10 months ago)
Nice, quiet place, as you can guess... Good possibilities to trail running too!
Juha-Matti Tamminen (11 months ago)
Great place if you need peace and silence. Good food, accomodation is nice, clean and well kept, they even have rooms for pet owners. Staff is cheerful and help in any way they can. There is a winery which sells its products, and they make also liquors and whiskey. Silence comes at 9pm, when everything closes and lights go out.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Limburg Cathedral

The Cathedral of Limburg is one of the best preserved late Romanesque style buildings. It is unknown When the first church was built above the Lahn river. Archaeological discoveries have revealed traces of a 9th-century church building in the area of the current chapel. It was probably built in Merovingian times as a castle and the chapel added in the early 9th century.

In 910 AD, Count Konrad Kurzbold (cousin of the future King Konrad I) founded a collegiate chapter of 18 canons, who lived according to the rule of Bishop Chrodegang of Metz, on the hilltop site. The original castle chapel was torn down and a three-aisled basilica was built in its place. The foundations of this basilica have been found beneath the present floor.

The construction of current cathedral is dated to 1180-90. The consecration was performed in 1235 by the archbishop of Trier. It seems certain that the cathedral was built in four stages. The first stage encompassed the west facade, the south side aisle, the choir and the transept up to the matroneum. This section forms the Conradine church. The second stage consisted of the addition of the inner pillars of the south nave. In this stage the bound system was first introduced. In the third phase, the matroneum in the southern nave was built. The fourth stage included the north side of the transept and the choir matroneum. By this stage Gothic influence is very clear.

The interior was destroyed by Swedish soldiers during the Thirty Years War (1618-48) and reconstructed in a late Baroque style in 1749. The Baroque renovation was heavy-handed: the surviving medieval stained glass windows were replaced; all the murals were covered up; the ribs of the vaults and columns of the arcades were painted blue and red; the capstones were gilded; the original high altar was replaced. The colorfully painted exterior was coated in plain white and the central tower was extended by 6.5 meters.

The collegiate chapter of Limburg was dissolved in 1803 during the Napoleonic period, but then raised to the rank of cathedral in 1827 when the bishopric of Limburg was founded. Some renovations in contemporary style followed: the walls were coated white, the windows were redone in blue and orange (the heraldic colors of the Duke of Nassau) and towers were added to the south transept (1865).

Further changes came after Limburg was incorporated into the Kingdom of Prussia in 1866. It was now the Romantic period and the cathedral was accordingly restored to an idealized vision of its original Romanesque appearance. The exterior stonework was stripped of all its plaster and paint, to better conform with the Romantic ideal of a medieval church growing out of the rock. The Baroque interior was stripped away and the wall paintings were uncovered and repainted.

Further renovations came in 1934-35, enlightened by better knowledge of the original art and architecture. Art Nouveau stained glass windows were also added. A major restoration in 1965-90 included replastering and painting the exterior, both to restore it to its original appearance and to protect the stonework, which was rapidly deteriorating while exposed to the elements.

The interior is covered in medieval frescoes dating from 1220 to 1235. They are magnificent and important survivals, but time has not been terribly kind to them - they were whitewashed over in the Baroque period (1749) and uncovered and repainted with a heavy hand in the Romantic period (1870s) before finally being restored more sensitively in the 1980s.