Tradition has it that the original Monastery of Valamo was founded in the 12th century or no later than the 14th century. New Valamo or New Valaam is an Orthodox monastery in Heinävesi. The monastery was established in 1940, when some 190 monks from Valamo Monastery in Karelia were evacuated from their old abode on a group of islands in Lake Laatokka (Ladoga) to Eastern Finland. The old Valamo Monastery was quite soon after the outbreak of the Winter War occupied by the armed forces of the Soviet Union.

After a temporary dwelling place the monks decided to settle down in Heinävesi in Eastern Finland. The choice fell on a mansion in Papinniemi, Heinävesi, after the monks had found there, quite surprisingly, an icon of St. Sergius and St. Herman, the founders of Valaam (Valamo) monastery in the 12th century. The monks considered this to be a sign from God. Having received evacuees from the Konevsky (Konevitsa) and Pechenga (Petsamo) monasteries, it is now the only monastery for men of the Finnish Orthodox Church.

There is a museum in Valamo monastery exhibiting the life in Orthodox monasteries from 18th century to present. The exhibition also shows the rebuilding of the monastery in Heinävesi, its ecclesiastical and social relationships and its publishing activities. The liturgical items reveal the high level of technical and artistic expertise that the Russian craft and design industry had achieved.

Only some of the monastery’s treasures are on display. These artefacts are mainly from the 19th century, although some are even from the 17th and 18th centuries. Similar objects are usually not seen, even in church, as the communion objects, the benediction crosses and the ecclesiastical textiles are stored in the sanctuary and the storage areas. The old artefacts are still in use, even though most of them are rarely used.

The cultural centre also hosts special collections on a temporary basis. The Monastery of Valamo has its own restaurant, accommodation and diverse tourist services.

References: Wikipedia, Museums of Southern Savo

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1940
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

Interesting Sites Nearby

User Reviews

Grigorii Torkel (3 years ago)
A great place to find peace in a hasty world for both believers and non believers. Many come back from the monastery feeling renewed and happy. It is also a great place for those seeking to come closer to God by providing a calm and prayerful atmosphere. Valamo monastary is home to several miracle working icons and many relics. It also has fascinating history and tradition. The monastery is located in a scenic area surrounded by forests and next to a lake. It provides accommodations and the monastery's trapeza has great food. It also has a winery, gift shop, educational center that provides a wide range of courses throughout the year, a library, as well as several exhibitions.
Azez Fahme (3 years ago)
Great and good place to rest and relax
Alice B (3 years ago)
A peaceful, beautiful area of Finland steeped in history. Well worth a visit, if you remain respectful of the atmosphere and culture. Rules include silence between 10pm and 6am, no photography during services, and no photos of any personnel or those living there. I would also recommend coming closer to winter for the quieter season. Food is served from 6am until 6pm (9pm on Fridays and Saturdays). There's a range of pastries and sandwiches, or the lunch/dinner buffet. The latter is more expensive but the ingredients are quality. The local cat is also very friendly and worth watching out for ☺️
Jori Brander (3 years ago)
Nice, quiet place, as you can guess... Good possibilities to trail running too!
Juha-Matti Tamminen (3 years ago)
Great place if you need peace and silence. Good food, accomodation is nice, clean and well kept, they even have rooms for pet owners. Staff is cheerful and help in any way they can. There is a winery which sells its products, and they make also liquors and whiskey. Silence comes at 9pm, when everything closes and lights go out.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kraków Cloth Hall

The Cloth Hall in Kraków dates to the Renaissance and is one of the city's most recognizable icons. It is the central feature of the main market square in the Kraków Old Town (listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1978).

The hall was once a major centre of international trade. Traveling merchants met there to discuss business and to barter. During its golden age in the 15th century, the hall was the source of a variety of exotic imports from the east – spices, silk, leather and wax – while Kraków itself exported textiles, lead, and salt from the Wieliczka Salt Mine.

Kraków was Poland's capital city and was among the largest cities in Europe already from before the time of the Renaissance. However, its decline started with the move of the capital to Warsaw in the very end of the 16th century. The city's decline was hastened by wars and politics leading to the Partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century. By the time of the architectural restoration proposed for the cloth hall in 1870 under Austrian rule, much of the historic city center was decrepit. A change in political and economic fortunes for the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria ushered in a revival due to newly established Legislative Assembly or Sejm of the Land. The successful renovation of the Cloth Hall, based on design by Tomasz Pryliński and supervised by Mayor Mikołaj Zyblikiewicz, Sejm Marshal, was one of the most notable achievements of this period.

The hall has hosted many distinguished guests over the centuries and is still used to entertain monarchs and dignitaries, such as Charles, Prince of Wales and Emperor Akihito of Japan, who was welcomed here in 2002. In the past, balls were held here, most notably after Prince Józef Poniatowski had briefly liberated the city from the Austrians in 1809. Aside from its history and cultural value, the hall still is still used as a center of commerce.

On the upper floor of the hall is the Sukiennice Museum division of the National Museum, Kraków. It holds the largest permanent exhibit of the 19th-century Polish painting and sculpture, in four grand exhibition halls arranged by historical period and the theme extending into an entire artistic epoch. The museum was upgraded in 2010 with new technical equipment, storerooms, service spaces as well as improved thematic layout for the display.

The Gallery of 19th-Century Polish Art was a major cultural venue from the moment it opened on October 7, 1879. It features late Baroque, Rococo, and Classicist 18th-century portraits and battle scenes by Polish and foreign pre-Romantics.