Kinn Church was built in the second part of the 12th century. It is the oldest and the only one of its kind in the Sunnfjord region, and it is one of the most impressive medieval monuments in Western Norway. It was the main church in the parish of Kinn until 1882, when the new Florø Church was built in the newly founded city of Florø.

Currently, Kinn Church is used only during the summer months. The church itself is built in a Romanesque style with Roman-arched windows and doors. The municipality of Kinn bought the church in 1866, and in 1868-1869, major repair work was carried out. Another restoration was carried out in 1911-1912. The most recent restoration work was completed in the late 1960s.

The 'lectorium' constitutes the oldest part of the church. Research has shown that it most likely was built in the mid-13th century, and the wooden reliefs have been carved by artists at the royal court in Bergen at the time of Håkon Håkonson. It is considered to be one of the finest gems from Norwegian medieval art.

The altar in the chancel is made of soapstone, and in the stone slab on top there is a small hole covered with a marble lid. This is where the holy objects and relics were hidden. The three saint figures in the triptych on the south wall in the chancel are made in the Netherlands, perhaps a gift to the church in the early 16th century. At Kinn, these figures have been renamed Ingebjørg, Borni, and Sunniva, all linked to local legends. The altarpiece was built in 1644, probably by Peter Negelsen who made altarpieces and other religious objects of art for many churches in this country.

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Address

Fylkesveg 552 1370, Kinn, Norway
See all sites in Kinn

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Marita Erdal (12 months ago)
Great place!
Hmm Mhm (12 months ago)
Great atmosphere and nice church hosts. And not least, beautiful views of Kinnaklova!
Inger Nipen (2 years ago)
Church from the 12th century that has been reverently rebuilt. Lecture from about 1250. Guided by local enthusiasts, who are eager and committed. Time prayer at 1 pm and 7 pm in the summer. The trip from the harbor to the church on the south side of the island and through H√łgaskaret takes you through a beautiful landscape with hills where the sheep find shelter, and mountains that sing in the wind. Beautiful!
Terje Skjerdal (3 years ago)
Here we have our fair for 900 years. A very special church, very beautiful inside.
Gry Josten Seim (3 years ago)
A beautiful church, single-storey of its kind, grinded the interior. From 1100 onwards the oldest part and the rest from about 1250. Lectorium in wood in front of the choir from 1250.
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