Lofotr Viking Museum

Vestvågøy, Norway

The Lofotr Viking Museum is a historical museum based on a reconstruction and archaeological excavation of a Viking chieftain's village on the island of Vestvågøya. In 1983, archaeologists uncovered the Chieftain House at Borg, a large Viking Era building believed to have been already established around the year 500 AD. A joint Scandinavian research project was conducted at Borg from 1986 until 1989. Excavations revealed the largest building ever to be found from the Viking period in Norway. The foundation of the Chieftain House at Borg measured 83 metres long and 9 metres high. The seat at Borg is estimated to have been abandoned around AD 950.

After the excavation ended, the remains of what had once been the long-house remained visible. The long-house has been reconstructed slightly to the north of the excavation site. In 1995, the Lofotr Viking Museum was opened. The museum includes a full reconstruction of the 83-metre long chieftain's house, a blacksmith's forge, two ships (replicas of the Gokstad ship, one in full scale size) and their boathouses, and various reenactments intended to immerse the visitor in life at the time of the Vikings. The main building was designed by Norwegian architect, Gisle Jakhelln.

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Founded: 500 - 950 AD
Category: Museums in Norway

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

David Oliveira (3 months ago)
Really cool place with a nice representation of the viking house. I went in May so low season, and walk all the way down the path to find out the ship was stored, would like to have know that before walking that much.
Shadow of Antioch (5 months ago)
A wonderful experience! The main section of the museum is your standard museum experience, with interesting films and trinkets—but the longhouse is where this place truly shines. The interior is breathtaking, and full with actors dressed in traditional clothing and occasionally treating you to traditional-style songs. Even with reduced staff numbers due to Covid, they showed up how to make a traditional pitta bread with our own hands over an open fire—at no extra cost! I'll definitely come back after Covid for one of the big events.
Jafnir Aseng (6 months ago)
A fantastic place to visit and so interesting and enjoyable a great experience. Go back in time and meet the Vikings
Márcia Vagos (8 months ago)
Very interesting museum with showing various findings of the Viking age. The artifact exhibition itself is not very large, but the reconstructed Viking house and Viking ships are the highlight of the visit. When I was there in the summer, there were also some fun outdoors activities such as arrow and axe throwing.
Márcia Vagos (8 months ago)
Very interesting museum with showing various findings of the Viking age. The artifact exhibition itself is not very large, but the reconstructed Viking house and Viking ships are the highlight of the visit. When I was there in the summer, there were also some fun outdoors activities such as arrow and axe throwing.
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