Lofotr Viking Museum

Vestvågøy, Norway

The Lofotr Viking Museum is a historical museum based on a reconstruction and archaeological excavation of a Viking chieftain's village on the island of Vestvågøya. In 1983, archaeologists uncovered the Chieftain House at Borg, a large Viking Era building believed to have been already established around the year 500 AD. A joint Scandinavian research project was conducted at Borg from 1986 until 1989. Excavations revealed the largest building ever to be found from the Viking period in Norway. The foundation of the Chieftain House at Borg measured 83 metres long and 9 metres high. The seat at Borg is estimated to have been abandoned around AD 950.

After the excavation ended, the remains of what had once been the long-house remained visible. The long-house has been reconstructed slightly to the north of the excavation site. In 1995, the Lofotr Viking Museum was opened. The museum includes a full reconstruction of the 83-metre long chieftain's house, a blacksmith's forge, two ships (replicas of the Gokstad ship, one in full scale size) and their boathouses, and various reenactments intended to immerse the visitor in life at the time of the Vikings. The main building was designed by Norwegian architect, Gisle Jakhelln.

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Founded: 500 - 950 AD
Category: Museums in Norway

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Márcia Vagos (45 days ago)
Very interesting museum with showing various findings of the Viking age. The artifact exhibition itself is not very large, but the reconstructed Viking house and Viking ships are the highlight of the visit. When I was there in the summer, there were also some fun outdoors activities such as arrow and axe throwing.
Alain Leneveu (5 months ago)
Must see! If you are interested by Vikings
Andrius Kvaščevičius (5 months ago)
Interesting museum on the main highway of Lofoten. Was impressed about the longhouse and the staff in the museum is very informative and friendly, gladly answering the questions about the vikings. On the way to the ship, it’s possible to shoot some arrows and throw axes. Try the mead as well!
Haroon Butt (5 months ago)
The museum has a lot to offer and there's lots to see. I would recommend bringing headphones or earphones. You can use your phone to listen in on the history of the different objects. Great views from outside and there are horses and sheep around the area. You get a pretty good idea of how Vikings used to live. There's also some axe-throwing and bow/arrow activities, as well as a ride with a viking boat (the weather has to be good tho)
Anna Banna (6 months ago)
Just amazing ❤️
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