On the sea approach to Kjøllefjord is the distinctive Finnkirka rock formation. According to legend, Finnkirka was an ancient sacrificial site for fishermen, seafarers and the Sami. Those sailing along the coast feared the stretch of sea past Nordkyn. On their eastward journey, seafarers sailed as far as the sea cliff Altertavla on the eastern side of the fjord and made an offering for a safe onward journey. On the return voyage, they sailed to Finnkirka on the western side of the fjord and gave an offering of thanks for surviving the voyage round Nordkyn.

The two rock formations are mentioned in old sources as a Sami sacrificial site and sacred sea cliff. Finnkirka is listed by The Directorate for Cultural Heritage in Norway (Riksantikvaren) as a Sami cultural monument. A marked trail offering spectacular viewing points leads out over the plateau above Finnkirka, but if you want to experience the cliffs at close range you need to go by boat.

Finnkirka has always led the way. Today the cliff is illuminated with artistic lighting when the Hurtigruten approaches it in the darkness of the Polar Night.

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    J W (20 months ago)
    Juha Varis (2 years ago)
    We hiked to the Finnkirka: 10 km (round trip) with medium challenging route. Beautiful landscapes along the route (small rivers and lakes, a valley), birds and different kind of rocks. Finnkirka you can see above it, no possibility to walk there.
    Vidar Hansen (3 years ago)
    Vidar Hansen (3 years ago)
    Aidas Kaminskas (3 years ago)
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