Pielinen Museum

Lieksa, Finland

Pielinen Museum is the second largest open-air museum in Finland. There are over 70 buildings or structures from different centuries, the oldest hut date back to the 17th century. The permanent exhibition focuses on the living and building conditions. The open-air museum area comprises three farmyards from the 18th to 20th centuries, forestry department with lumber cabins, a mill, farming and fire sections.

Reference: Museot.fi

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Address

Pappilantie 2, Lieksa, Finland
See all sites in Lieksa

Details

Founded: 1963
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

More Information

www.lieksa.fi
www.museot.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Kauko Siltala (2 years ago)
Paljon mielenkiintoista näkemistä/ kokemista..varatkaa vähintään päivä aikaa sillä museoalue om suuri ja nähtävää paljon.Kiitos hyvälle alueen esitteliälle..
Mirja-Liisa Neuvonen (2 years ago)
Hyvä palvelu. Museona melkeimpä 1 ja sitten vasta Seurasaari.
Henna-Riikka Honkanen (2 years ago)
Mielenkiintoinen paikka. Todella laaja. Opas kiersi ulkoalueilla, häneltä sai kysellä. Opastettu kierros olisi ollu vielä kivempi. Ehdottomasti käymisen arvoinen!
Ng Kwok (3 years ago)
It was a really nice place to visit. There is a sense of going back into time with the way the people of the area had lived. Places are restored well, and good explanations. In most cases there is information also available in English. There is little multimedia hence it is a great place to experience things using eyes than in virtual reality, or through a directors perception, and child friendly.
Ilkka Lavas (3 years ago)
Unique history. Interestin also for kids.
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