Navahrudak Castle Ruins

Navahrudak, Belarus

Navahrudak Castle was one of the key strongholds of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, cited by Maciej Stryjkowski as the location of Mindaugas's coronation as King of Lithuania as well as his likely burial place. Modern historians cannot make up their minds as to the true location of Mindaugas's coronation.

As early as the 14th century, Navahrudak is known to have possessed a stone tower along the lines of Tower of Kamyanyets. Other fortifications were of timber. The castle was stormed by the Teutonic Knights under Heinrich von Plötzke in 1314. Although the attack was not successful, the tower sustained substantial damage.

During the reign of Vytautas the Great four new stone towers were added to the system of Navahrudak fortifications. In the 17th century the main castle boasted 7 towers, apart from those of the Lesser Castle. Navahrudak was one of the northernmost forts besieged by the Crimean Tatars in the 16th century.

Navahrudak was twice occupied by Russian forces during the Russo-Polish War (1654–67). Further destruction was inflicted by the Swedes who sacked Navahrudak as part of the Great Northern War in 1706. Attempts to preserve the ruins from further decay were undertaken in the 1920s. The castle grounds at present provide the setting for medieval reenactment and theatrical jousting.

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Address

P10, Navahrudak, Belarus
See all sites in Navahrudak

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Belarus

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Роман Журко (7 months ago)
Nice place
Valentine v (10 months ago)
Very beautiful historical place. And sightseeing from the hill is amazing!
Christoph Menelaou (14 months ago)
An interesting place, good views
Hakan Canbaz (3 years ago)
Very nice historical town in Belarus. Very mystic place. Everybody must visit
Юлия Левчук (3 years ago)
You should visit it! Such a beautiful view!!!
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