Transfiguration Church

Polotsk, Belarus

Transfiguration Church of the St. Euphrosine monastery is a well-preserved monument of Pre-Mongol Rus architecture. It was built between 1152 and 1161 by the Polatsk architect Ioann by the order of the princess St. Euphrosyne of Polatsk as a cathedral church of the Convent of the Saviour and St. Euphrosyne. In 1582, King Stefan Batory gave the church to the Order of Jesuits. In 1832, the church was placed under the Orthodox administration, and in 1990 it became a property of the Belarusian Exarchate. In the 19th century it was partially remodeled according to the design by the architect A. Port.

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Founded: 1152
Category: Religious sites in Belarus

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Vladimir Fateyev (2 years ago)
Wanted.
Aleksander Turbin (2 years ago)
They are not allowed to take pictures inside, I could not wait for the nun to leave, very little everyone hid the place.
Tanya Сити (2 years ago)
Peace and a feeling of quiet happiness. The present place of the Force.
Feodor Sursky (2 years ago)
Holy Transfiguration Church is simply amazing! This ancient monument drevnepolotskogo architecture. There's even easier to breathe, especially in the cell nun! Even your breath away as she was an ascetic!
Alexander Gorbel (3 years ago)
Unique frescoes, details of the materials of the pillars are open to the eye. Full immersion in the darkness of the Middle Ages. And although the nuns, by faith, tell stupid legends about the construction of the temple for 30 days, the structure itself still leaves a good impression. Built for ages. Painted for ages. But the restoration was delayed, we are waiting for the end)
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