Troitsky Markov Monastery

Vitebsk, Belarus

Svyato-Troitsky Markov Monastery (Holy Trinity Markov Monastery) is one of two modern monasteries in Vitebsk (second one is female Svyato-Dukhov Monastery). Markov Monastery was founded in the 14th-15th century. A legend indicates that a certain Mark found a place to stay alone and built a chapel there. After he was joined by like-minded persons, who formed the monastery.

The monastery existed till 1576, after it was abolished and monastic Тrinity Church became a parish church. The monastery revived in 1633 by a duke Lev Oginski. In 1656 Patriarch of Moscow Nikon presented to the monastery a wonder-working copy of Kazan Virgin icon. In 1690 Pokrovskaya (Intercession) Church was burned down was reconstructed. In 1760 in this place the new preserved stone cathedral was constructed. Now it's covers to Kazan Virgin icon.

After October Revolution, in 1920 Svyato-Troitsky Markov Monastery was abolished afresh. All buildings except Kazan Cathedral of 1760 were demolished. Kazan church were the only Vitebsk church functioned in Soviet time. The monastery was revived 23 November 2000. Now it's situated at factory territory in the middle of factory buildings.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Belarus

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Siarhei Dunets (12 months ago)
This church was the only one working religious feature in Vitebsk in the Soviet time. All others were destroyed. Now the situation is different. All religious people have an opportunity to visit their own churches.
Yury Lega (2 years ago)
Глубина истории…
Виктор Джеранов (2 years ago)
Это один из благодатных мест в Беларуси и дух Божий почивает в нем!
Парчинский Сергей (3 years ago)
исторический памятник витебска. старейшая церковь
Михаил Тютюнов (3 years ago)
Красивое место на берегу Двины, если бы не завод
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