Szczecinek Castle

Szczecinek, Poland

As early as at the end of XIII century, there was a Slavic settlement on the island nearby the place of current Szczecinek Castle. The border nature of the settlement and its excellent defensive qualities contributed to the decision made around the year 1310 by Duke Warcislaw IV to build there a castle. This way the castle of Szczecinek became the seat of Starostes who in the name of the duke held the power here. First of them was Otto von Wedel. At the same time, the settlement on the mainland was awarded town privileges.

The location of the castle in Szczecinek was also affected by building a fortress in Czluchow by the Teutonic Knights and the growing threat from the Teutonic Order and Brandenburg. In 1356, the buildings from the times of Wartislaw IV were dismantled and a new castle was built from the obtained material, this time fully made of bricks. At the very beginning, the castle consisted essentially only of the south wing. The courtyard was surrounded by a wall and all the buildings were settled in a rectangle related plan.

The gate was facing the city, which means it was north-facing. The wooden bridge supported by characteristic piles, known for the later drawings, connected it with the mainland. The construction of the castle was carried out until the year 1364. However, there were a few interruptions. The first one took place when the border of the Teutonic Knights state was moved, as a result of which Szczecinek partly lost its military and strategic importance. However, by the end of XIV century, the works resumed and even another floor of the main wing was built.

The north wing which included the entrance gate was probably built during the expansion carried out in the years 1459-1474, at the times of Duke Eric II. The building had three floors and there was a four-sided tower at the eastern corner. In the years 1606-1610, Duke Philip II rebuilt the south wing giving it a shape typical of Renaissance architecture. In 1619, Duke Ulrich erected in place of the dismantled north wing a new one, which survived until 1801. Another reconstructions took place in 1690 and 1780. The building was also reconstructed several times during XIX and XX century. In 1653 the castle was taken over by Brandenburg and as a result it began to fall into decline. In the years 1780 to 1793 it housed Frederick the Great's abdominal belts manufacture. In the years 1800-1880, in turn, it served as hospital and poorhouse. During World War II, if you believe some stories, the castle was a Gestapo torture chamber in which, among others, soldiers of Battalion 'Odra' were interrogated.

After the war, the army occupied the castle and later it served as Jantarii travel lodge. In 2011, the Municipal Office of Szczecinek began a comprehensive revitalisation of the historic south wing of the castle, which will serve as a training and conference center.

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Details

Founded: 1310
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

www.szczecinek.pl

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Agnieszka Urbaniak (4 months ago)
I recommend a piece of history told in an interesting way
yurii ryndych (9 months ago)
Ok
Kamil Stachowski (17 months ago)
To be fair, this is not an extraordinary monument, but it's interesting enough and the passion of the guide makes it live again. An opportunity to hold some of the most iconic weapons of WWII in your hands, and with a bit of imagination, to feel as if you were transported back in time.
Jakub Cybulski (23 months ago)
W okolicy jest wiele (+10) konstrukcji bojowych. Teren jest poprzecinany transzejami. Doskonałe miejsce by wybiegać psa. Teren oczyszczony i rozmontowany dawno temu (+ 30lat). Występuje zwierzyna dzika, lisy, sarny, zające. Nie wiem jak obecnie ale na ten bunkier dało się wspinać.
Sven Schöne (2 years ago)
Leider war das Bunkermuseum geschlossen. Das Aussengelände ist kein aber sehr interessant. Die kleineren Bunker im Umfeld kann man sich ansehen wenn man sie im Wald findet.
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