Theophany Convent

Kostroma, Russia

Bogoyavlensky Convent is one of the most populous Russian Orthodox convents. It is situated in Kostroma and is known as the location of the ancient Feodorovskaya Icon of God"s Mother. The convent was founded in the 15th century by Nikita, a disciple and a relative of St Sergius of Radonezh.

The five-domed katholikon of traditional Byzantine design was constructed under Ivan the Terrible, starting in 1559. The Tsar accused the father superior and some of the brethren of supporting his rival Vladimir of Staritsa and had them executed in 1570.

The monastery was besieged and taken by Aleksander Józef Lisowski during the Time of Troubles. The attack claimed the lives of 11 monks. A monastic house dates from the 17th century. The other buildings arose from the monastery"s reconstruction in the Russian Revival style in the late 19th century. In 1863 the monastery was transformed into the convent.

After the Revolution the convent was abolished and was not revived until the 1990s. The remains of the wall paintings in the katholikon were destroyed in a recent fire.

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Details

Founded: 1559-1565
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Gulnara Okhramenko (11 months ago)
A very crowded place full of tourists and parishioners.
Alexander Kldiashvili (14 months ago)
Very beautiful old monastery. You feel really good and calm here.
Tatiana Cherkasskaia (2 years ago)
The entrance to the territory of the monastery is closed, you can only visit the cathedral (entrance from the street)
Dieter Haas (3 years ago)
A wonderful church with a very special and old icon of the God's Mother. Very nice and friendly nuns. We felt very good and full of peace at this holy place.
Карина Скорик (3 years ago)
Peaceful and calm place to worship and find yourself.
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