Theophany Convent

Kostroma, Russia

Bogoyavlensky Convent is one of the most populous Russian Orthodox convents. It is situated in Kostroma and is known as the location of the ancient Feodorovskaya Icon of God"s Mother. The convent was founded in the 15th century by Nikita, a disciple and a relative of St Sergius of Radonezh.

The five-domed katholikon of traditional Byzantine design was constructed under Ivan the Terrible, starting in 1559. The Tsar accused the father superior and some of the brethren of supporting his rival Vladimir of Staritsa and had them executed in 1570.

The monastery was besieged and taken by Aleksander Józef Lisowski during the Time of Troubles. The attack claimed the lives of 11 monks. A monastic house dates from the 17th century. The other buildings arose from the monastery"s reconstruction in the Russian Revival style in the late 19th century. In 1863 the monastery was transformed into the convent.

After the Revolution the convent was abolished and was not revived until the 1990s. The remains of the wall paintings in the katholikon were destroyed in a recent fire.

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Details

Founded: 1559-1565
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Наталия К. (20 months ago)
Женский( ранее, до 1847 года- мужской) монастырь Костромской епархии Русской православной церкви, расположенный в Костроме. В Богоявленском кафедральном соборе находится Феодоровская икона Божией Матери - почитаемая Русской православной церковью чудотворная икона Богородицы, известная как одна из святынь дома Романовых.
Олег Нищетов (21 months ago)
Сам храм красив. Но очень отталкивает церковный бизнес. Берут денег немало за все, что получится.
Sveta Lebedeva (21 months ago)
Если вы не сильно верующий человек, то не очень интересно. От старых стен осталась одна башня, а на территорию вход закрыт. Оценка 4 за историю места
Елена Кукина (2 years ago)
Монастырь оставил очень приятные впечатления. Красота расписных сводов и стен, ощущения благодати, внимательные и добрые монахини. А главное - чудотворная Феодоровская икона Божьей Матери.
sergeysvetlof † MyKostroma 44 Rossia (3 years ago)
And dedicate 7 days to God! Today we were at a holy spring in Privolzhsk, we bathed in holy water, and even visited our nunnery in the city center) put candles, pray for oneself and those who are dear)))
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