Debrecen Great Church

Debrecen, Hungary

The Reformed Great Church is the symbol of the Protestant Church in Hungary, and it is because of this church that Debrecen is sometimes referred to as 'the Calvinist Rome'. With a ground space of 1500 m² it is the largest Protestant church in Hungary. It also has the largest bell of all Hungarian Protestant churches. The Great Church was built between 1805 and 1824 in neoclassical style.

A church already stood here in the Middle Ages, but it burnt down. St. Andrew Church, a Gothic hall church was built in its place between 1297 and 1311. Its area was about 16x46 meters. This church burnt down in 1564. In 1626 the already Protestant citizens of Debrecen started to build the St. Andrew Church again. With the support of George I Rákóczi construction was finished in 1628. In 1640-1642 a tower was constructed and a large bell – about 300 kg, made of Austrian cannonballs – was placed in it. In 1707, during the freedom fight led by Francis II Rákóczi the church suffered heavy damages from the imperial troops. The church burnt down on June 11, 1802, during the great fire which destroyed most of Debrecen.

The current church was designed by Mihály Péchy, but the plans were altered several times during the construction, causing much frustration to the builders. The original plan featured a church with a cross-shaped ground plan and a large dome, but the plan was discarded, mainly due to financial reasons.

The western tower was finished by 1818, the eastern tower on August 6, 1821. The towers are 61 meters high. Originally a dome was planned to crown the building, this was not built, but when the construction was finished, the facade seemed unattractive with the large empty space between the towers, so in 1823/24 the facade was slightly modified, using the plans of Károly Rábl. The tower roofs feature Baroque elements. A nice panorama can be seen from the left (western) tower. The old Rákóczi bell, restored after the fire, is in this tower too.

The Great Church also has historical significance: during the Hungarian Revolution of 1848 Lajos Kossuth made the Hungarian Declaration of Independence here on April 14, 1848, and was elected governor of the country here. The armchair in which he sat can be viewed in the church.

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Details

Founded: 1805-1824
Category: Religious sites in Hungary

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Ahmad Maswadeh (4 months ago)
Comparing to buildings in Debrecen, it's the biggest and most beautiful. When you're in front of it, you'll have a special nice feeling
Ahmad Maswadeh (4 months ago)
Comparing to buildings in Debrecen, it's the biggest and most beautiful. When you're in front of it, you'll have a special nice feeling ? Of course comparing to Budapest and western Europe churches it's so simple and small, but still it stands in a good shape here in Debrecen. You can only get it in Saturdays and Sundays, and the tickets is around 1000 HUF (2.5 Euros).
Dávid Veszelovszki (6 months ago)
Nice church, simple, with a nice garden.
Dávid Veszelovszki (6 months ago)
Nice church, simple, with a nice garden.
Steven (6 months ago)
Very beautiful church. Well maintained and great for taking pics outside. Lots of area to move around outside and just a step away from coffee bars and places to eat or chill. Situated near the centre of Debrecen in an open courtyard with a water fountain.
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