Rogalin Palace

Rogalin, Poland

Rogalin is primarily famous for its 18th-century baroque palace of the Raczyński family, and the adjacent Raczyński Art Gallery, housing a permanent exhibition of Polish and international paintings (including Paul Delaroche and Claude Monet and the famous Jan Matejko's large-scale painting Joanna d'Arc). The gallery was founded by Edward Aleksander Raczyński. Rogalin is also known for its putatively 1000-year-old oak trees on the flood plains of the Warta and the historical St. Marcellinus Church, whose design was inspired by the Roman temple Maison Carrée in Nîmes, France.

The last owner of the estate was Count Edward Bernard Raczyński, who in 1979–1986 was President of the Polish Republic in exile. His sarcophagus is deposited in the Raczyński Mausoleum, under the church in Rogalin. In his testament, Count Raczyński bequeathed his estate in Rogalin (including the family palace, gallery, library, and church) to the Polish people.

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Details

Founded: 1768-1776
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ana Aha (2 years ago)
It's a good place to spend a day. They have a lot of houses where you can discover history of the palace. They have a nice souvenir shop. The gallery with paintings is amazing! It's a must to visit in my view. Also because they have the largest painting made by a Polish painter. It's huge! Very friendly staff. There is a place where you can leave your coat when you visit the castle.
Peter Wouw (2 years ago)
Very beautiful palace. Tour guide in different languages
Maciej Polakowski (2 years ago)
Palace and it's gardens are definitely a worth stopping point if you're nearby. Exhibitions are interesting and cleverly made so you won't be bored. Everything including parking (and apart from gardens) cost a bit so be ready for it. Also arm yourself in a lot of free time you will need it.
D.R. Ouroboros (2 years ago)
A wonderful Park in spring and summer, although a little empty in the winter, autumn will still make it an interesting place for photography and the botanical gardens are home to many species.
Hannah Bartlett (3 years ago)
A beautiful restored palace with audio guides (available in English) to show you around. The restoration work has been done to the highest quality and gives a good flavour of what living there would have been like. The restoration has been done from photos of the time and the effort put in is really impressive. The attached art gallery is really worth a look and the gardens are well kept too.
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