Rogalin Palace

Rogalin, Poland

Rogalin is primarily famous for its 18th-century baroque palace of the Raczyński family, and the adjacent Raczyński Art Gallery, housing a permanent exhibition of Polish and international paintings (including Paul Delaroche and Claude Monet and the famous Jan Matejko's large-scale painting Joanna d'Arc). The gallery was founded by Edward Aleksander Raczyński. Rogalin is also known for its putatively 1000-year-old oak trees on the flood plains of the Warta and the historical St. Marcellinus Church, whose design was inspired by the Roman temple Maison Carrée in Nîmes, France.

The last owner of the estate was Count Edward Bernard Raczyński, who in 1979–1986 was President of the Polish Republic in exile. His sarcophagus is deposited in the Raczyński Mausoleum, under the church in Rogalin. In his testament, Count Raczyński bequeathed his estate in Rogalin (including the family palace, gallery, library, and church) to the Polish people.

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Details

Founded: 1768-1776
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Per Aastrup Olsen (2 years ago)
Awesome place. Must visit.
Lenka Pokorná (2 years ago)
Very nice pace and park.
Terezia Nagy (3 years ago)
very nice renovated castle. the library is awesome. The staff is very nice however they do not speak english, we got an audio guide from them and we ejnoyed the tour.
Zbyszek i Lusia Fabjanski (5 years ago)
Beautiful place. A must to stop when one is in Poznań. The palce have wonderful restored rooms. The self guided tour is well designed with many lenguges to choose from.
Ana Aha (6 years ago)
It's a good place to spend a day. They have a lot of houses where you can discover history of the palace. They have a nice souvenir shop. The gallery with paintings is amazing! It's a must to visit in my view. Also because they have the largest painting made by a Polish painter. It's huge! Very friendly staff. There is a place where you can leave your coat when you visit the castle.
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