Carlow Castle has a large rectangular three-story limestone keep with circular towers at each angle. The castle dates from the early 13th century. It was built by William Marshal the elder in the time period between 1207 and 1213 which he spent in Ireland. The castle in Carlow was the very first of its kind in Ireland.

The castle was handed over to the crown in 1306, granted in 1312 to Thomas Plantagenet, confiscated by the crown in 1537 as the landlords were absent, bought by the Earl of Thomond in 1616, changed hands multiple times until it was taken by Oliver Cromwell in 1650 but was later returned to the Earl of Thomond. In 1814 the castle was widely destroyed in an attempt to create more space for the conversion into a lunatic asylum with the help of explosives. Just the outer face of the west wall and the two neighbouring towers could be preserved.

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Address

Mill Lane 6, Carlow, Ireland
See all sites in Carlow

Details

Founded: 1207-1213
Category: Castles and fortifications in Ireland

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

TAOREED OLATILEWA (2 years ago)
I needed satnav for Bus, Rigid and articulated trucks please!!!
Anthony Moran (2 years ago)
A beautiful castle ruin that badly needs repairing for safety. You can no longer get to close to it as parts of the tower are unstable.
Anthony Moran (2 years ago)
A beautiful castle ruin that badly needs repairing for safety. You can no longer get to close to it as parts of the tower are unstable.
Arrianne Ivyr Rozario (2 years ago)
This is practically it. The good thing is it's in the town so you can enjoy a walk and explore their town which is quite nice. People are friendly and always happy to give directions. Some even share a bit of history.
Arrianne Ivyr Rozario (2 years ago)
This is practically it. The good thing is it's in the town so you can enjoy a walk and explore their town which is quite nice. People are friendly and always happy to give directions. Some even share a bit of history.
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