Battenberg Castle Ruins

Battenberg, Germany

It is presumed that the Battenberg castle was constructed by Count Frederick III of Leiningen (d. 1287), and it remained a possession of the House of Leiningen - until 1689, when it was destroyed during the War of the Palatine Succession by French troops. Together with Neuleiningen Castle, on the opposite hillside 1,400 metres to the north, it controlled access to the Eckbach valley.

On three sides the outer walls of the castle follow the edge of the steep-sided hill spur. The wall on the fourth side was protected by a moat, now completely filled in. Surviving structures include: the outer walls, a gate tower on the western side near the northwest corner of the site, a battery tower with embrasure in the centre of the south side, and the vaulted cellar and foundations of a large dwelling. Attached to this is a staircase tower, erected in the 16th century, which is still standing.

The ruins are in private ownership but there is limited public access.

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Address

K30, Battenberg, Germany
See all sites in Battenberg

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

william leslie (2 years ago)
Nice little ruin to visit. Not as large as the other ones in the area. Cool for a quick stop for the views over the vakkey
Stephen Moose (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle with a winery on the top and awesome views of the surrounding countryside.
Ideos Steff (2 years ago)
Cool for kids
Christian (3 years ago)
Relaxing place
worldfootage (3 years ago)
Man benötigt viel Zeit, wenn man speisen möchte.
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