Carn Ban is a Neolithic chambered tomb located on the Isle of Arran. It is considered as one of the most famous of the Neolithic long cairns of south-west Scotland. It is of a type found across south-west Scotland known as a Clyde cairn. It is trapezoidal in shape, with a semicircular forecourt at the upper northeast end. The forecourt has an entrance leading into a long chamber divided into compartments by cross-slabs, similar to the arrangement at Torrylin Cairn, about 3 miles to the southwest. The chamber of Carn Ban is 30 metres long and 18 metres broad. The tomb was excavated in the late 19th century, but the only finds were a flint flake, an unburnt fragment of human bone, and a pitchstone flake.

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St Hb (8 months ago)
Nothing to go mad about is an island that's it.
Deeshan Paul (9 months ago)
Amazing...loved it. Stunning place with fantastic trails. People are really friendly too!
Michael Perry (9 months ago)
Beautiful little island. Well worth a day or two to visit.
Patricia Montgomery (9 months ago)
Beautiful island .Easy to get around and a wonderful place to chill out .
Gordon Langridge (9 months ago)
Beautiful places for solitude - leave no trace when departing and keep it beautiful.
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